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Opinion

  • By Brian Owens

    May is National Foster Care Awareness month.

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Foster Care Coalition, nearly 400,000 children are currently in foster care, with almost 7,000 of those in Kentucky.

    Out of this number, many will eventually be reunified with their family members once it is seemed safe to do so (51 percent in 2012), while others will wait and age out of the system, having never had the blessing of being the member of a loving family.

  • By Tamara Smith

    News Advertising

     

  • Throughout my career as a former education reporter, I’ve heard many buzz words. The latest and most popular, in my opinion, seem to be “21st Century school” and “college and career readiness.”

    These phrases most likely have little significance for people who don’t work in the education field. Without getting into the technicalities, these phrases really mean a school that is up-to-date in methods of preparing students for a career and/or college path.

  • By Luz Vega-Marquis

    President & CEO, Marguerite Casey Foundation

    Take a look at your bills. What do you pay for food, housing, clothing, health care, utilities and transportation? How much would it take for your family to just get by? Could you make it on $15,000 a year? $21,000? What would your family have to do without to make ends meet?

    What exactly does it take to make it in America?

  • The Anderson County Chamber of Commerce will host a political forum for all candidates running in the May primary election Thurs., May 1, at Anderson County High School starting at 6:30 p.m.

    This is not a debate. The content of each candidate’s speech will be directed to the businesses and citizens of Anderson County. All candidates will be given a maximum of 4 minutes to speak.

    Prior to the debate and at intermission, candidates can interact with the general public and pass out material in the foyer area.

  • Life is good! Winter is over and I get a few days off to celebrate spring’s arrival. So what if it is a cool spring. It’s still way warmer than those bone chilling months and I’ve got spring fever! The moon is right so I’m planting onions, potatoes, spinach and lettuce seeds. I’ve got broccoli plants to put in as well.

    I feel really bad for all the teachers and kids who had to miss spring break so I thought I’d share a little humor in that vein. I know there will be some “skippers” in the school district!

  • Hello Anderson County.

    After nearly a decade of writing, photography, graphic design, social media and telling a community’s story, I’ve returned to the business of writing, photography, graphic desi… yeah, it’s been a little confusing for me, too.

  • Editorial cartoon by Terry Wise.

  • Janis Buntain, 57, Mt. Eden, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at her home. 

    Survivors included her husband, Larry Buntain; two sons, James Tyler and Christian Buntain; one stepson, Larry Buntain, Jr.; one stepdaughter, Juanita Buntain; and her mother, Frances Parsley of Indianapolis.

    Funeral services were Friday at Pleasant Hill Christian Church in Mt. Eden.  Burial was in Best Cemetery.

    Arrangements were by Webb Funeral Home.

  • As I shook the woman’s hand before the church service began, she asked me where I worked.
    “Oh, I’m a reporter at The Anderson News,” I chirped with all the bursting, overflowing brightness of a new college graduate.
    “Oh. Good luck with that,” she said. The woman turned away to welcome someone else sitting behind her.
    She was right, in a way.  

  • A riddle for you —
    If there’s no Leap Day this year, do you still celebrate your birthday?
    According to reader Peggy Ratliff, her sisters did.
    Peggy emailed and called last week in response to a column I wrote a few weeks ago, asking if readers knew anyone with a Leap Day birthday.
    Peggy did. She knew three.
    Anita Hawkins Landry was born Feb. 29, 1952.
    Two Leap Days and eight years later, Bette Hawkins Inman was born on Feb. 29, 1960.

  • We all want to help protect our children, to keep their names and class photos from being splashed onto the evening news as a newscaster smoothes his voice into a sympathic purr, the one he uses for tragedies.
    Constable Joe Kalil — parent, airline pilot and firearm instructor from Boone County — is trying to prevent school shooting tragedies like Newtown from happening ever again with a volunteer program to allow Kentucky teachers to carry firearms.

  • As red roses and helium balloons rotated in and out of the middle school doors last Friday morning, I found myself in a vicious conversation cycle.
    Again.
    I fought so hard not to talk about the snow, the ice, the salt, the weather: conversation starters so common as to bore everyone to tears by now. (Sorry, board members, teachers and other Anderson County district staff. I’ll try to be a better conversationalist in the future.)