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Opinion

  • Life is good! Winter is over and I get a few days off to celebrate spring’s arrival. So what if it is a cool spring. It’s still way warmer than those bone chilling months and I’ve got spring fever! The moon is right so I’m planting onions, potatoes, spinach and lettuce seeds. I’ve got broccoli plants to put in as well.

    I feel really bad for all the teachers and kids who had to miss spring break so I thought I’d share a little humor in that vein. I know there will be some “skippers” in the school district!

  • Hello Anderson County.

    After nearly a decade of writing, photography, graphic design, social media and telling a community’s story, I’ve returned to the business of writing, photography, graphic desi… yeah, it’s been a little confusing for me, too.

  • Editorial cartoon by Terry Wise.

  • Janis Buntain, 57, Mt. Eden, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at her home. 

    Survivors included her husband, Larry Buntain; two sons, James Tyler and Christian Buntain; one stepson, Larry Buntain, Jr.; one stepdaughter, Juanita Buntain; and her mother, Frances Parsley of Indianapolis.

    Funeral services were Friday at Pleasant Hill Christian Church in Mt. Eden.  Burial was in Best Cemetery.

    Arrangements were by Webb Funeral Home.

  • As I shook the woman’s hand before the church service began, she asked me where I worked.
    “Oh, I’m a reporter at The Anderson News,” I chirped with all the bursting, overflowing brightness of a new college graduate.
    “Oh. Good luck with that,” she said. The woman turned away to welcome someone else sitting behind her.
    She was right, in a way.  

  • A riddle for you —
    If there’s no Leap Day this year, do you still celebrate your birthday?
    According to reader Peggy Ratliff, her sisters did.
    Peggy emailed and called last week in response to a column I wrote a few weeks ago, asking if readers knew anyone with a Leap Day birthday.
    Peggy did. She knew three.
    Anita Hawkins Landry was born Feb. 29, 1952.
    Two Leap Days and eight years later, Bette Hawkins Inman was born on Feb. 29, 1960.

  • We all want to help protect our children, to keep their names and class photos from being splashed onto the evening news as a newscaster smoothes his voice into a sympathic purr, the one he uses for tragedies.
    Constable Joe Kalil — parent, airline pilot and firearm instructor from Boone County — is trying to prevent school shooting tragedies like Newtown from happening ever again with a volunteer program to allow Kentucky teachers to carry firearms.

  • As red roses and helium balloons rotated in and out of the middle school doors last Friday morning, I found myself in a vicious conversation cycle.
    Again.
    I fought so hard not to talk about the snow, the ice, the salt, the weather: conversation starters so common as to bore everyone to tears by now. (Sorry, board members, teachers and other Anderson County district staff. I’ll try to be a better conversationalist in the future.)

  • In the movies they call it a “meet cute.”
    The beautiful ingénue drops her stack of papers and bumps heads with a stranger as they both kneel to pick up the mess.
    They look up and their eyes meet.
    A relationship, and the plotline of many a romantic comedy, is born.
    Meeting our loved ones for the first time is usually not as adorable, simple or extraordinary as television and the silver screen depicts those moments.

  • Time stops for no one, and no one is more aware of this than Anderson County administrators looking to make up snow days.
    Sure, snow days come with hot chocolate and marshmallows, warm fires and sledding, cabin fever and movie marathons.
    They also involve questions about funding formulas, continued compliance with state law and strong opinions about which days are the best days to recover classroom time.

  • Column as I see ’em (for the last time) …
    The graveyards are full of irreplaceable people.
    A former co-worker told me that God knows how many years ago after a much younger version of me proudly announced that I was leaving my job for greener pastures.
    I did my best to be humble and gracious when I announced I had taken another job, but the fellow who made the graveyard quip obviously saw right through me.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    Is it because it’s viewed as blood money?
    That was one response when folks in our office were debating why on earth no public agency in Anderson County has applied for a Bluegrass Pipeline grant.
    I guess the blood money scenario is a possibility, but given the stated state of financial affairs around here, it would seem they’d take money from nearly any source.
    After all, it’s not like they’re taking a one-week loan from Tony Soprano, you know?

  • A new year brings a new fixation on loss.
    We tell ourselves: yes, this is the year we’ll lose, and we’ll lose triumphantly for the better.  
    Shed those hated pounds, chop off your hair and slough away the stress for a fresh, scrubbed outlook on life.
    This is extremely difficult to do in January.
    No offense to everyone who celebrates birthdays (sorry, Dad and Martin Luther King Jr.), anniversaries or other memorable occasions during the month, but I hate January.

  • Two welcome signs are in need of, repairs or simply need to be taken down.
    You may have seen them on North Main Street or Broadway. They’re old and faded, and a little worse for wear.
    In my opinion, they’re in need of some tender loving and care. And I’m not even sure that would solve the problem.
    I thought it was the city’s responsibility to maintain these two welcome signs, so I dashed off a quick email to City Clerk Robbie Hume.  

  • Since it first popped up as an issue last year, I’ve been asked time and again when I will take an editorial stance on the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline.
    In fact, there are several folks who have flat-out demanded that I do so, either to draw me out as a pipeline proponent or hold me aloft as yet another member of the media to fall in line by opposing it.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    I sometimes feel like Al Pacino in the third (and worst) “Godfather” movie. You know, the one where aging mafia Michael Corleone boss laments, “Every time I try to get out, they pull me back in.”

  • Since I started writing opinion columns for The Anderson News, I spend the last week of the year ripping those same columns to shreds.
    I retroactively go over the sentences I loved writing and the people that inspired them. The ill-conceived, awkward sentence constructions I wish died on the keyboard as I typed them. The brilliant, sophisticated prose I dreamed only after our Monday deadline.
    I don’t mentally review every single one of the nearly 52 columns I wrote in 2013.

  • Editor’s note: The following was written by Francis P. Church and was first published in The New York Sun in 1897. Church married shortly after the editorial appeared. He died in April, 1906, leaving no children.
    Virginia O’Hanlon went on to graduate from Hunter College with a Bachelor of Arts degree at age 21.
    Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died on May 13, 1971, at the age of 81, in a nursing home in Valatie, NY.

  • Here comes Santa Claus, here comes Santa Claus —
    Running down Broadway?
    No, really.
    I know — I was as skeptical as you when I got the call from one of our advertising representatives, Tamara Smith, last Friday afternoon.
    The conversation on the phone was one of those where I repeated everything she told me incredulously because, really.
    “Santa? On Broadway? OK … ”
    A Santa and his partner-in-crime Mrs. Claus running down a Lawrenceburg street?
    Sure. Why not?