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Opinion

  • Pet owners were thisclose to having to deal with what would have been an onerous law that missed being approved by a whisker.

    The fiscal court last Tuesday morning voted 3-3, which means failure, on a “companion animal” ordinance that, to put it kindly, was ill-conceived at best.

    In what appeared to be an instance of good intentions run amok, the ordinance failed and did so miserably on many counts. Topping that list were the dictates regarding the size and amount of time dogs could be kept in a shelter.

  • Jacob Brown didn’t know what he was doing in the sixth inning.

    No, it’s not that he was lost or that he wasn’t in control. It’s that he was in the zone. He was, as the Red Sox always tell each other, living in the moment.

    Ahead by a score of 9-0 over the league-leading Mets, Brown was in the midst of pitching a complete game no-hitter. It wasn’t until after the game, with the teams getting ready to shake hands, that Brown was informed of his accomplishment.

  • As someone who has less than a year of living in Anderson County under her belt, I’m proud to know I live in an area with heroes at every turn.

    Look no further than this week’s front page to see several examples of proof to back up that statement.

    Or ask any member of the Farley family ­— I’m sure they’ll tell you Anderson County is full of heroic men and women.

    While boating on the Kentucky River on Thursday, the Farleys got stuck on top of the dam at Lock 5.

  • Law needed to replace worn, torn flags

    To the editor:

    My name is Nick Schrieber and I am a 12-year-old Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg student.

    I think that all flags at businesses in Lawrenceburg should be checked to make sure they aren’t torn.

    They show not only our pride in our country but also the pride in our veterans, living and dead.

    My grandfather, Danny D. Dunn, retired 100 percent disabled and was in the Vietnam War.

  • Crazy. That’s what most people thought I was when I accepted this job four years ago last month.

    “You’re going to leave beach life in North Carolina to move to Kentucky?” they asked. “You’re an idiot.”

    Perhaps, but having led a fairly nomadic life while plying my craft, I was confident that I’d enjoy Lawrenceburg as much as any of my stops along the road.

    I’ve reheated this particular skillet of hash to let you know that not only don’t I regret moving here, I’m mighty glad I did.

  • Have you been following the news about the oil spill in the Gulf? It’s bad news, any way you look at it. Just because it’s not happening here in Anderson County doesn’t mean that it won’t affect you. The people in Spain didn’t think a volcano in Iceland would affect them either. This spill is an environmental disaster that will touch each and every one of us, as well as our children’s children.

  • Much of the process of selecting a new superintendent for Anderson County Schools is done behind closed doors.

    The process is entirely legal because elected bodies are allowed to discuss personnel issues, among a limited list of other things, during an executive session as long as no official action is taken.

    Still, it’s no reason for those elected to their positions to take the task lightly.

    This is not to say that they do or that they will, but instead to serve as a reminder of the importance of the task at hand.

  • It’s not what happens to you that’s important, it’s how you respond to it.

    It’s a simple sentence my high school soccer coach told our team one day before practice. Standing around 5-foot-6 at the time, I wasn’t your prototypical goalkeeper. I was just a freshman and I had earned a starting spot on the varsity team at a high school with a rich soccer history.

    Needless to say, I was terrified. It didn’t help my older brother was a senior, all-district captain. If there was one person who wasn’t afraid to chew into me, it was him.

  • County clerk says thanks for voter patience

    To the editor:

    I would like to thank voters for their patience on May 18.

    Several changes have taken place since the 2008 General Election. The Anderson County Board of Elections was forced to move several voting locations due to disability guidelines and other regulations.

    We also replaced the old outdated machines with new paper ballot scanners which will reduce the time and long lines at the polls.

  • Startled, I woke up in the middle of the night between Sunday and Monday. I’m not sure what I had been dreaming about, but in a sleepy haze I awoke thinking about two things: this week’s column and coping strategies.

    More specifically, I was painfully aware that I still needed to write a column, and my dream must have been about dealing with something gone wrong, because the first few thoughts on my mind were how people deal with situations differently — how we all use different coping strategies.

  • Burke needs to develop own script

    To the editor:

    My comments are directed toward Joan Burke’s guest column regarding the attacks by Christians on Facebook and what she calls the ranting by the Tea Movement.

    Not sure where she has been on some of this because it appears she does not see or hear the same things many of us do. But on this part I would definitely agree with her, that no one should wish the president dead.

  • As I sit at my computer staring at the cursor blinking endlessly before my eyes, I wonder and agonize as to what my first column for The Anderson News should be about.

    I covered the UK men’s basketball team last season for the University of Kentucky student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel, how about a piece on my opinion of whether or not head coach John Calipari will leave for the NBA?

    No, I don’t want to dive in to such a sensitive subject around the Bluegrass in my first meeting with you all.

  • Column as I see ’em ...

    First, a correction from last week’s column in which I lauded Sheila Mitchell for the next school superintendent.

    Several folks caught a stupid mistake I made, and I’m grateful to them for pointing it out.

    I said that if chosen, Mitchell would be the county’s first female school superintendent. Had my brain been in gear before making that claim, I would have recalled that Emma B. Ward — you know, the lady after which one of our elementary schools is named — held that distinction decades ago.

  • As giddy as a school girl.

    That’s how I described my mood after having my picture taken with University of Kentucky men’s basketball player Ramon Harris at Friday’s DARE graduation. And I know I wasn’t the only one.

    “That’s Harris! That’s him right there!” I heard one DARE graduate shout in disbelief while standing about 10 feet in front of the senior Wildcat who graduated last weekend.

    “I’ll never wash my hand again,” said another after getting a high-five.

  • Column first nice thing written about Tyrone

    To the editor:

    I would just like to simply say thank you for the article you wrote in The Anderson News on Wednesday about Tyrone.

  • Column as I see ’em ...

    Here is some unsolicited advice for the board of education, but advice I hope they’ll at least consider.

    It’s a given that the school boards association is clearly the end-all, be-all when it comes to helping districts hire a new superintendent.

    That being said, here’s hoping that hiring from within isn’t dismissed out of hand as a bad idea.

  • Truck, tractor pull not a benefit to our ears

    To the editor:

    I read your comments in the last edition of The Anderson News regarding the truck and tractor pulls held at the county park. I understand the benefits to the community of holding events such as these in the county. However, there is a downside that you did not mention.

  • It was a warning I dismissed almost immediately, not because I am brave, but mostly because I hate being told I can’t do something.

    “Welcome to Anderson County, but if you know what’s good for you, you’d better stay out of Tyrone,” a few folks told me when I arrived in town four years ago.

    “Not even the police like to go down there,” they said.

  • Welcome, May. The ducks are on the pond and the locust is in bloom. Spring really has sprung. I love to watch the trees leaf out and admire the hundreds of shades of green that end up painting the landscape. Out here in the country, we’ve got lots of trees, but some are growing purple boxes.

  • This weekend, I was one of the lucky ones.

    Most of us were.

    Rain fell at a steady pace in Lawrenceburg for nearly two days, and aside from the small stream that developed in my front yard, I escaped unscathed.

    Though I saw the rain falling outside my window, it was hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that some of my neighbors were flooded from their homes, watching the water pile up in their back yards from neighbors’ porches.