.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • With each day that passes, students here find a new way to make me proud to cover education in Anderson County.

    In a few short weeks, students all across the district donated enough (whether monetarily or with tangible items) to send over $2,500 and a truck load of supplies to earthquake victims in Haiti.

    And because I’m fairly certain I’m not aware of all of the existing projects, the grand totals are sure to be much more than that.

  • My computer went belly up three days ago. I’ve had to revert to my yellow legal pad and black felt-tip pen, or whatever kind of tip it may be nowadays. This was, in the past, the only way I could write anything until I started working on my computer.

    Now trying to go cold turkey from my machine for me is like withdrawal from tobacco. My hands flitter about with nothing to click. I can’t open up anything. My fingers yearn to delete the forwards in my e-mail, and not being able to check that is like a starvation diet.

  • I probably lost a layer or two of enamel while gritting my teeth during last Tuesday’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.

    Out of the blue, Judge-Executive Steve Cornish began discussing a recent budget committee meeting — a meeting about which the public should have been notified and one that I would have certainly attended.

  • When my husband and I lived in California, we first heard of Rush Limbaugh when Mike would be out on a construction job and the other carpenters had a radio tuned to KFBK-AM in Sacramento. Limbaugh was, before this job, a terminated rock DJ on his last leg to re-invent himself as a hard-nosed-but-humorous talk radio host. He hurled insults and joked about the lower middle-class neighborhood of Rio Linda in Sacramento.

  • Within the next day or two, local churches and pastors will find a letter from The Anderson News in their mailboxes.

    Don’t worry — it’s not a bill. And it’s not a matter of what you owe us.

    Instead, it’s a matter of what we owe you.

    As a community newspaper, part of our job is to inform the public about events going on in the community. That’s why you’ll find a community calendar in each issue of our paper, and two (count them — two) community calendars on our website.

  • Have you noticed that it’s staying light longer? In only 52 days spring will arrive and it’s not too soon for me.

    As time marches on, I watch the moon. As January draws its last breath, the Full Wolf Moon comes into view this Saturday. I hope all that white stays up in the air and not on the ground.

    February is typically our roughest weather month. Remember, last year’s ice storm hit in February. February also brings Ground Hog Day on the second and the Full Snow Moon on February 28. Here on the farm, that means seed starting time.

  • Ritchie thanks community for support

    To the editor:

    It has been a privilege to serve the past 16 years as Coroner of this county. This community has provided me with tremendous support during each election and throughout each year of service. But, now with somewhat regret, I have decided not to seek re-election as Coroner of Anderson County.

  • You have to hand it to Kentucky Utilities.

    During the worst economy in most of our lifetimes, the company that provides electricity to over 6,000 Anderson County homes and businesses boldly jutted out its chin and proposed a 13.7 percent rate increase for homeowners.

    In terms of temerity, that would be on par with Tiger Woods borrowing his estranged wife’s computer to surf dating websites while on a visit to beg her to take him back.

    Both are nearly unthinkable.

  • Say what you want about Big Blue Nation — just don’t call us uncaring.

    Along with guiding the Wildcats to an 18-0 record, being the only unbeaten team left in the nation and propelling the team to (what will inevitably be) a No. 1 ranking, John Calipari and his behind-the-scenes team organized the “Hoops for Haiti” telethon that raised over $1 million for the Red Cross to provide help in Haiti.

    One. Million. Dollars.

  • Mary Peach obit was inspiring

    To the editor:

    After reading the obituary for Ms. Mary Peach, wife of Al Peach, I felt inspired to write this letter, which is a first for me.

    My hope is that when all is said and done in this life, those who knew us can say some of the things that were said about Ms. Peach.

    If your readers have not read her obituary, I encourage them to do so and consider as I have what our obituary might say.

  • By now we’ve all heard about the devastating earthquake in Haiti. It is a disaster for untold numbers of people and it should make us all stop and think. Is our house as prepared as it should be? What if we had no stores right now? Food means survival.

  • Since this is my first column in The Anderson News, I wanted to tell how I ended up in Lawrenceburg. I was born in Kentucky, but after a few years in college I found my way to the West Coast. I spent 20 years in Northern California, met my husband and had my children there. In 1996, we decided to move back to Kentucky. We chose Lawrenceburg because we had a farm here.

  • Legislative sessions are much like snowflakes. They appear the same from a distance, but look closely and you’ll see each has a pattern all its own.

    Right now, the 2010 Regular Session that began in Frankfort Tuesday looks to the casual observer like most legislative sessions held in even-numbered years. It will last 60 legislative days. Its main purpose is to pass a state budget before a new two-year budget cycle begins in July. And legislative procedure will be the same, too.

  • Wise's lame political 'comics' are a joke

    To the editor:

    Every time I look at one of political cartoonist Terry Wise’s “comics” I get so mad at the lame political comments, I had to write.

    All your characters look the same — like Walmart shoppers zoned out on Mt. Dew and WWE TV shows.

    Obviously there are people who think you can draw since you are in The Anderson News. But to me, you are not funny. I just don’t get your stuff.

  • History has made it clear that it’s impossible to legislate morality.

    Not even Moses zapping “Thou Shalt Not Kill” onto a slab of rock and throwing it at a bunch of heathen fornicators has been able to stop mankind from greasing each other by any means available, and probably never will.

    Gun laws have never prevented people from misusing them, and laws against robbing banks have never kept people from robbing them.

  • Let me introduce you to two people:

    The first is a 15-year-old freshman in high school. She’s a cheerleader, and a little boy-crazy. She’s insecure, as most freshmen are, and she tries desperately to keep up with the latest trends, fashions, hairdos and hair-don’ts. She listens to pop music and can tell you anything and everything you could possibly want to know about Top 40 artists.

  • There is hope for horses in hard times

    To the editor:

    The story about the abandoned horses [“Abandoned horses put down” on Dec. 30] was heartbreaking. I’m an animal lover and have dogs, cats and horses myself. It angers me that someone would let these magnificent creatures get to such a debilitated state that they couldn’t be helped. Unfortunately some people that own animals are ignorant and won’t reach out for help. 

  • Column as I see ’em ...

    Kudos to the city council for discussing how to collect city property taxes from those who don’t pay.

    It’s flat-out amazing that, in 2010, the council is just now getting around to doing so, but that’s another story.

  • Here’s a happy thought. Spring will be here in just a little over two months. With that in mind I thought this would be a good time to start planning the garden. We’ve got all of those gardening catalogues arriving in our mailbox almost daily. All you need is paper and pen to get started.

    I love to page through the catalogues and circle the item and the page numbers of those things that I’m interested in possibly growing. Don’t hold back. You never know what the next catalogue will bring and you may want to plant several varieties of the same thing.

  • New Year’s resolutions are made to be broken.

    It’s a negative outlook, I know, but usually it’s true. And, that’s why I typically don’t make resolutions.

    But hey, it’s a new year and by my calculations, with all the resolutions I’ve broken in the past, I’m due to make a resolution that will actually stick.

    So, to increase my chances of making one I’ll actually go through with, I’ve made four for 2010, ranging from small and specific to large and broad.