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Opinion

  • Columnist Cheryl Steenerson warns against leaf spot and early blight.

    For her full column, see this week's Anderson News available on newsstands across the county.

    Subscribe online or call 502-839-6906.

  • I was in a movie theater. My husband had gotten up during the film to use the restroom, and while he was gone, an enraged gunman entered the room and started to shoot. There were screams and people began to run frantically. He hit me twice. Each bullet skidded over an opposite side of my face. I was bleeding, but I don’t remember any pain. The gunman left and my husband came back. He looked at me and said, “Well, I guess we better get you to a hospital.”

    Then, I woke up.

  • Hey, it’s May. Have you seen all the wildflowers popping up all over the place? The blue phlox are my favorite. Everything seems to be coming alive these days and it sure makes me smile. You never know what a rough winter will take out.

    These multiple summer droughts and winter ice storms can take their toll on all plants. Plants flowering now are putting everything they’ve got into put on a show for us. The least we can do is help them along with a little food.

  • Column as I see ’em …

    Well I certainly received my comeuppance in this week’s letters to the editor.

    Not that I’m complaining. As those who work with me will attest, there is nothing more enjoyable to me than letter writers taking me to task on my columns or editorials.

    Opinions are like, well, you know, and everyone has one, including me. While I certainly have a mighty big megaphone from which to shout each week, this page offers equal access to those who disagree.

  • Editor Carlson needs dog training

    To the editor:

    I am writing you in regards to your recent columns and editorials pertaining to pit bulls.

    You seem to only want to hear one side of the story.

    I believe one description you used was “slobbering, blood-eyed monster chained up next door.” I am personally disgusted to read such articles. I am hopeful that this letter will help clarify some things about pit bulls and also help educate others.

  • It’s almost May. I open the stand in 24 more days. Yikes. The Old Farmer’s Almanac is predicting an average temperature of 65 degrees. Thank God. Mother Earth is warming up and here we thought it would never come. We could still have some cool days in May.

    I remember my first Mother’s Day here because it snowed. It hasn’t since, so let’s let hope spring eternal. The rule of thumb around here is that you can plant the summer garden after Derby Day. That’s this weekend.

  • Don’t jump on pit bull ‘ban’ wagon

    To the editor:

    I never thought I’d hear of our editor wanting to take away our rights, but there it was in print in last week’s paper.

    He admitted to me on the phone that he has had a personal incident with a pit bull and said he has shot one and would do it again if it threatened his family.

    Well, we all would Ben, but we wouldn’t ban an entire breed from the county.

  • What if my columns were only 140 characters every week?

    Some of you would jump for joy, because really, how much damage could I do in 140 characters? Others of you might actually miss the extra words, and some of you might actually like to see an extra 140 characters every other day or so.

    To the last group of you: You’re in luck.

  • I hope each week that editorials and columns I write will draw opposing opinions, especially those that are reasonable and well thought out.

    So when gardening columnist and apparent pit bull apologist Cheryl Steenerson called and said she was going to set me straight after last week’s editorial about pits, I welcomed her letter with glee. (See her letter on this page).

  • What’s it going to take for city and county lawmakers to wake up and smell the pit bull doo-doo?

    For the third time in as many weeks those sworn to protect and serve had to kill dogs in the line of duty, the third coming last Thursday when a pair of pits reportedly terrorized the community around David Drive.

    Unlike the first two instances, these pits launched their attack on two other dogs, killing a black lab and mauling another.

  • Sunshine! I am so glad to see the sun and feel its warmth.

    Did it seem like a long winter to you? We now have over 13 hours of daylight and the spring vegetables are getting bigger by the day. As the weather improves, we won’t be the only ones getting out and about more.

    Start keeping a close eye on your crops for insect damage. Aphids, cabbage worms, slugs, snails and mites will start to look for food and your harvest is in their sights. A strong blast of water will usually knock them off. You can also use insecticidal soap spray to keep them from coming back.

  • You might consider me a bit of pansy or, at the very least, overly emotional because I usually get sappy and teary-eyed when I hear children sing.

    Now, don’t get me wrong, I don’t start bawling when a random child bursts into a mediocre version of “I’m a Little Teapot” on television, but my eyes get a little misty when children put forth an effort and believe in themselves and what they’re singing.

  • Drunk in church, not booze, is disrespectful

    To the editor:

    I choose not to drink alcohol. I have not had a drop in almost 15 years.

    The decision to not drink alcohol is a personal decision, just like the decision to consume alcohol is also a personal decision.

    I am not anti-alcohol. I keep alcohol in my home so if guests decide to drink a beer they can; it’s their choice.

  • Dear golf lovers, I used to be one of your worst enemies, but time has turned me into one of your allies.

    No, I’m not leaving The Anderson News to pursue a career in the LPGA, but I have grown to be not only tolerant, but appreciative of the sport.

    About a year ago, I wouldn’t have been caught dead watching golf on television. I could understand that some people (not me) would be able to enjoy playing the game, but to sit for hours and just watch it seemed like a boring waste of time.

  • Column as I see ’em ...

    The sale of Wild Turkey is among the best economic news Anderson County has seen in some time.

    No knock against the soon-to-be former owners, but Campari appears to be a terrific company and well positioned to make one of the world’s best-known bourbons stake an even greater claim in the spirits market.

  • Temperatures in the 60s one day and snow the next. Welcome to spring in Kentucky, where all four seasons seem to fight for dominance in April.

    We average about 11 inches of rain this month, so be thankful for the winds. They dry out the soil so we can plant. The temperatures will keep ranging, but eventually we will have more warm than cold.

  • Article ‘defamed’ dog owner

    To the editor:

    In response to the article, “Harrodsburg Road boy, 11, mauled by pit bull mix,” in the paper on April 8.

    I would like to express disagreement with the validity of the information of the report. I want to express that this article was defamation of character on my father’s behalf. Defamation of an individual is when a false statement is made causing the individual to suffer harm and these damages are usually harmful to the individual’s reputation.

  • Country music and its fans aren’t typically labeled as being progressive or ahead of the curve, but the Academy of Country Music took a giant step forward Sunday night.

    Women ruled the awards show, and — continuing in my “Go women!” mentality from last week — I couldn’t be happier.

    I’ve always been a fan of a woman who can flat out sing, and if she has the talent to write her own masterpieces, that’s just the icing on the cake. At least six of these women were honored this past weekend at the ACM awards.

  • At the moment, tobacco producers around the state are getting into high gear to begin growing transplants.

    Healthy transplants are a cornerstone of a successful tobacco crop, and disease in the float system often interferes with the production of high-quality seedlings.

    Planning and preparation now can lead to better disease control and better yields of transplants in the spring.

  • Don’t blame smokers for limited shopping

    To the editor:

    This goes to the lady who says she doesn’t shop in Lawrenceburg because she doesn’t know which businesses are smoke-free and would like The Anderson News to publish the smoke-free businesses.

    Then please print the businesses you can smoke in and see which list is longer.