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Opinion

  • I hope each week that editorials and columns I write will draw opposing opinions, especially those that are reasonable and well thought out.

    So when gardening columnist and apparent pit bull apologist Cheryl Steenerson called and said she was going to set me straight after last week’s editorial about pits, I welcomed her letter with glee. (See her letter on this page).

  • What’s it going to take for city and county lawmakers to wake up and smell the pit bull doo-doo?

    For the third time in as many weeks those sworn to protect and serve had to kill dogs in the line of duty, the third coming last Thursday when a pair of pits reportedly terrorized the community around David Drive.

    Unlike the first two instances, these pits launched their attack on two other dogs, killing a black lab and mauling another.

  • Sunshine! I am so glad to see the sun and feel its warmth.

    Did it seem like a long winter to you? We now have over 13 hours of daylight and the spring vegetables are getting bigger by the day. As the weather improves, we won’t be the only ones getting out and about more.

    Start keeping a close eye on your crops for insect damage. Aphids, cabbage worms, slugs, snails and mites will start to look for food and your harvest is in their sights. A strong blast of water will usually knock them off. You can also use insecticidal soap spray to keep them from coming back.

  • You might consider me a bit of pansy or, at the very least, overly emotional because I usually get sappy and teary-eyed when I hear children sing.

    Now, don’t get me wrong, I don’t start bawling when a random child bursts into a mediocre version of “I’m a Little Teapot” on television, but my eyes get a little misty when children put forth an effort and believe in themselves and what they’re singing.

  • Drunk in church, not booze, is disrespectful

    To the editor:

    I choose not to drink alcohol. I have not had a drop in almost 15 years.

    The decision to not drink alcohol is a personal decision, just like the decision to consume alcohol is also a personal decision.

    I am not anti-alcohol. I keep alcohol in my home so if guests decide to drink a beer they can; it’s their choice.

  • Dear golf lovers, I used to be one of your worst enemies, but time has turned me into one of your allies.

    No, I’m not leaving The Anderson News to pursue a career in the LPGA, but I have grown to be not only tolerant, but appreciative of the sport.

    About a year ago, I wouldn’t have been caught dead watching golf on television. I could understand that some people (not me) would be able to enjoy playing the game, but to sit for hours and just watch it seemed like a boring waste of time.

  • Column as I see ’em ...

    The sale of Wild Turkey is among the best economic news Anderson County has seen in some time.

    No knock against the soon-to-be former owners, but Campari appears to be a terrific company and well positioned to make one of the world’s best-known bourbons stake an even greater claim in the spirits market.

  • Temperatures in the 60s one day and snow the next. Welcome to spring in Kentucky, where all four seasons seem to fight for dominance in April.

    We average about 11 inches of rain this month, so be thankful for the winds. They dry out the soil so we can plant. The temperatures will keep ranging, but eventually we will have more warm than cold.

  • Article ‘defamed’ dog owner

    To the editor:

    In response to the article, “Harrodsburg Road boy, 11, mauled by pit bull mix,” in the paper on April 8.

    I would like to express disagreement with the validity of the information of the report. I want to express that this article was defamation of character on my father’s behalf. Defamation of an individual is when a false statement is made causing the individual to suffer harm and these damages are usually harmful to the individual’s reputation.

  • Country music and its fans aren’t typically labeled as being progressive or ahead of the curve, but the Academy of Country Music took a giant step forward Sunday night.

    Women ruled the awards show, and — continuing in my “Go women!” mentality from last week — I couldn’t be happier.

    I’ve always been a fan of a woman who can flat out sing, and if she has the talent to write her own masterpieces, that’s just the icing on the cake. At least six of these women were honored this past weekend at the ACM awards.

  • At the moment, tobacco producers around the state are getting into high gear to begin growing transplants.

    Healthy transplants are a cornerstone of a successful tobacco crop, and disease in the float system often interferes with the production of high-quality seedlings.

    Planning and preparation now can lead to better disease control and better yields of transplants in the spring.

  • Don’t blame smokers for limited shopping

    To the editor:

    This goes to the lady who says she doesn’t shop in Lawrenceburg because she doesn’t know which businesses are smoke-free and would like The Anderson News to publish the smoke-free businesses.

    Then please print the businesses you can smoke in and see which list is longer.

  • Ahh … spring in Kentucky. It’s always full of surprises and spring break is full of outdoor chores. I’m actually on vacation this week, doing that very thing — chores. As of this writing, the weather folks are predicting periods of rain and temperatures in the 60s. I’m guessing I won’t be able to dig much dirt. I can, however, do lots of other things.

  • It’s doubtful that the city and county would even consider banning people from owning pit bulls. The potential legal challenges from pit bull enthusiasts (to characterize those folks kindly) alone would likely sway the thinking of those who could make that happen, and it’s hard to blame them for that.

    However, here’s a way that would add some serious muscle to local ordinances about vicious dogs already on the books and perhaps get rid of nearly all pit bulls in the process.

  • We’ve all seen and heard it before — a fairly attractive woman walking down the street trying not to pay attention to the whistles, inappropriate phrases and cat calls being rained upon her for whatever reason.

    Unfortunately, my friends and I have been victims of these cat-callers more than once. Yes, dear readers, even here in Lawrenceburg.

    Just the other day, I walked out in front of our office on Main Street to meet a friend for lunch. I had no sooner walked out our front door in my dress and heels, when someone whistled in my direction.

  • April 1 — you’ve got to be kidding. Get it? Don’t you love to play practical jokes or tease on April Fools’ Day? Silly things can make you laugh. Usually, the laugh comes only after you realize it’s a joke.

    I’m reading a great book now on the importance of play. We’re actually hardwired to have play in our lives and we need it for our mind and body. Besides, it’s fun to laugh.

  • Paper made dismissed sub a ‘monster’

    To the editor:

    Wow! The article in last week’s paper about [dismissed Turner substitute teacher] Barbara Stires made her sound like a monster.

    Last October she and several ladies from church went on a retreat. She was a sweet, loving and caring woman.

  • Syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker opined recently that at least some of the blame for the decline of newspapers rests at the feet of right-wing pundits who have spent the past couple of decades pummeling them as left-wing rags.

    She makes a fairly compelling argument. From Limbaugh to Hannity to Savage, the radio heads bash and bash and bash some more the nation’s dead tree journalists for their biased reporting which indeed often veers left of center.

  • Columnist should stick to stats, photos

    To the editor:

    The following is a letter to Linda Graves, the News-Democrat columnist in Carrollton who criticized some fans of the Lady Bearcats for their behavior during a recent basketball game.

    Dear Mrs. Graves:

  • My years of scribbling notes and asking pesky questions have landed me in front of some fairly interesting and noteworthy folks over the years.

    The pinnacle was probably the time I spent about 10 minutes one-on-one with W’s dad, the first president Bush, following a speech he gave during the Clinton years.