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Opinion

  • Letter writer Steve Vogelsburg says the city council made the right decision in not allowing the Sunday sale of package alcohol.

    Letter writer Stacie Jackson says The Anderson News should print the names of "deadbeat" parents.

    Letter writer Mark Warford thanks the community for donations during the Post Office's food drive.

    Letter writer Edwin McKee sends a thank you to those who participated in the 18th annual youth all-star basketball tournament in March.

  • General Manager Ben Carlson says elected officials should create the county's dog ordinance themselves instead of forming a committee to do so.

    To see the other issues he takes on this week, pick up a copy of The Anderson News available on newsstands across the county.

    Subscribe online or call 502-839-6906.

  • Keeping up with technology is growing more and more important by the day. Unfortunately, I’ve never been the best at staying on the cutting edge. Fortunately, my husband is.

    One of the things he has introduced me to in the past couple months is Google Reader. Basically it’s a centralized place I can go to read news that I pick out by subscribing to RSS feeds. I don’t understand it all or how it works really, but I do enjoy getting news tailored to my interests.

  • Staff Columnist Shannon Brock gives props to the Junior Miss contestants and committee for making this year's program go off without a hitch.

    For her full column, see this week's Anderson News available on newsstands across the county.

    Subscribe online or call 502-839-6906.

  • Guest Columnist Kate McCann says the Lawrenceburg City Council let local businesses down by failing to allow the Sunday sale of package alcohol.

    To read more of McCann's thoughts on the issue, see this week's edition of The Anderson News available on newsstands across the county.

    Subscribe online or call 502-839-6906.

  • Column as I see ’em

    The past week of watching the workings of local government prove that there truly is more than one way to skin a cat.

    While there’s no doubt Judge-Executive Steve Cornish could do very nicely, thank you, without being nitpicked by magistrates over his proposed budget, that it’s happening really is a good thing.

    Cornish says he did his level best in assembling a budget he thinks is fiscally responsible during a poor economy.

  • Want a good deal on spring blooming trees? Now’s the time!

    There are so many things blooming right now, but it is that smell of honeysuckle that shouts summer to me. I love it. The spring-blooming trees have been gorgeous, and now is the time to grab some deals and get your hands on some beauties.

    There are many low maintenance flowering trees that won’t litter up your car and sidewalks. The Chanticleer Pear has white blooms and tiny fruit that is edible, but the birds usually get them first.

  • Fiscal court racially profiling dogs

    To the editor:

    Racial profiling is now going to the dogs. Anderson County Fiscal Court is set to review a new dog ordinance that specifically targets “pit bulls” as vicious dogs. Even with organizations such as the ASPCA, AKC and the American Veterinary Medical Association opposed to breed specific legislation, our fiscal court drafted this revised ordinance with exactly that in mind.

  • Columnist Cheryl Steenerson warns against leaf spot and early blight.

    For her full column, see this week's Anderson News available on newsstands across the county.

    Subscribe online or call 502-839-6906.

  • I was in a movie theater. My husband had gotten up during the film to use the restroom, and while he was gone, an enraged gunman entered the room and started to shoot. There were screams and people began to run frantically. He hit me twice. Each bullet skidded over an opposite side of my face. I was bleeding, but I don’t remember any pain. The gunman left and my husband came back. He looked at me and said, “Well, I guess we better get you to a hospital.”

    Then, I woke up.

  • Hey, it’s May. Have you seen all the wildflowers popping up all over the place? The blue phlox are my favorite. Everything seems to be coming alive these days and it sure makes me smile. You never know what a rough winter will take out.

    These multiple summer droughts and winter ice storms can take their toll on all plants. Plants flowering now are putting everything they’ve got into put on a show for us. The least we can do is help them along with a little food.

  • Column as I see ’em …

    Well I certainly received my comeuppance in this week’s letters to the editor.

    Not that I’m complaining. As those who work with me will attest, there is nothing more enjoyable to me than letter writers taking me to task on my columns or editorials.

    Opinions are like, well, you know, and everyone has one, including me. While I certainly have a mighty big megaphone from which to shout each week, this page offers equal access to those who disagree.

  • Editor Carlson needs dog training

    To the editor:

    I am writing you in regards to your recent columns and editorials pertaining to pit bulls.

    You seem to only want to hear one side of the story.

    I believe one description you used was “slobbering, blood-eyed monster chained up next door.” I am personally disgusted to read such articles. I am hopeful that this letter will help clarify some things about pit bulls and also help educate others.

  • It’s almost May. I open the stand in 24 more days. Yikes. The Old Farmer’s Almanac is predicting an average temperature of 65 degrees. Thank God. Mother Earth is warming up and here we thought it would never come. We could still have some cool days in May.

    I remember my first Mother’s Day here because it snowed. It hasn’t since, so let’s let hope spring eternal. The rule of thumb around here is that you can plant the summer garden after Derby Day. That’s this weekend.

  • Don’t jump on pit bull ‘ban’ wagon

    To the editor:

    I never thought I’d hear of our editor wanting to take away our rights, but there it was in print in last week’s paper.

    He admitted to me on the phone that he has had a personal incident with a pit bull and said he has shot one and would do it again if it threatened his family.

    Well, we all would Ben, but we wouldn’t ban an entire breed from the county.

  • What if my columns were only 140 characters every week?

    Some of you would jump for joy, because really, how much damage could I do in 140 characters? Others of you might actually miss the extra words, and some of you might actually like to see an extra 140 characters every other day or so.

    To the last group of you: You’re in luck.

  • I hope each week that editorials and columns I write will draw opposing opinions, especially those that are reasonable and well thought out.

    So when gardening columnist and apparent pit bull apologist Cheryl Steenerson called and said she was going to set me straight after last week’s editorial about pits, I welcomed her letter with glee. (See her letter on this page).

  • What’s it going to take for city and county lawmakers to wake up and smell the pit bull doo-doo?

    For the third time in as many weeks those sworn to protect and serve had to kill dogs in the line of duty, the third coming last Thursday when a pair of pits reportedly terrorized the community around David Drive.

    Unlike the first two instances, these pits launched their attack on two other dogs, killing a black lab and mauling another.

  • Sunshine! I am so glad to see the sun and feel its warmth.

    Did it seem like a long winter to you? We now have over 13 hours of daylight and the spring vegetables are getting bigger by the day. As the weather improves, we won’t be the only ones getting out and about more.

    Start keeping a close eye on your crops for insect damage. Aphids, cabbage worms, slugs, snails and mites will start to look for food and your harvest is in their sights. A strong blast of water will usually knock them off. You can also use insecticidal soap spray to keep them from coming back.

  • You might consider me a bit of pansy or, at the very least, overly emotional because I usually get sappy and teary-eyed when I hear children sing.

    Now, don’t get me wrong, I don’t start bawling when a random child bursts into a mediocre version of “I’m a Little Teapot” on television, but my eyes get a little misty when children put forth an effort and believe in themselves and what they’re singing.