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Opinion

  • Missed opportunity to teach a lesson

    To the editor,

  • I’m a math nerd. I can’t help it — I absolutely love numbers.

    In fact, to this day, my high school calculus teacher has a hard time believing I ended up in a career working with words (of all things). I sometimes find it hard to believe myself.

  • Remember Jeff Johns’ letter to the editor in last week’s paper? The one in which he challenged me to weigh in on the opinion of some of his relatives that President Obama is actually the devil incarnate?

    To that challenge I harken back to a comment then-candidate Obama gave when a preacher of national renown asked him about his position on abortion. Like Obama said, that is “above my pay grade.”

  • Gov. Beshear’s visit last week to discuss early childhood education sparked an interesting conversation here in our office.

    Granted, no one on either side of this issue pretends to know a fraction of what it really takes to publicly educate a child, and we’re sure this concept certainly would not pass muster with state and federal education czars so deeply invested in the current system.

    Instead, the following is more of a “throw it on the wall, see what sticks” sort of scenario, but one that drew raves from some, raspberries from others.

  • Hey, Carlson, is Obama the devil or not?

    To the editor:

    Mr. Carlson;

    You have supplied everyone with some needed comments and views about local issues. But you haven’t expressed your opinion openly about our current president on the first page of the editorial section, sir.

    [Some of my relatives] have expressed their view, in private, that Barack Obama is the devil incarnate. Mr. Carlson, could you please disabuse them of this quaint notion about our president — about this very bright and well-meaning man?

    Jeff Johns

  • A lot has been said about Eastern Kentucky over the past month or so, and I’ve taken notice. How could I not?

    Eastern Kentucky is home to me. More specifically, the mountains of Pineville are home to me.

    Pineville has been in the news on several occasions at the state level, but most of the national focus has been on Harlan and Hazard and other towns in between. In a sense, that’s still home to me. My daddy still drives to Harlan every day for work, and I’ve played many a softball game in Hazard.

  • I love sunsets. Watching our sun spin out of our sight is a beautiful thing.

    We don’t think about our earth spinning around at over 18 mph while it travels at over 1,000 mph around its axis, but we are doing just that. Amazing, isn’t it? Going that fast without even realizing it should remind us that time is passing quickly and planting time will be upon us before we know it.

    Time to plan.

  • I know Valentine’s Day is over but love is in the air. You can literally smell it, although, the aroma is not very pleasant.

    Pepe’ Le Pew is looking for love now, and that means we need to be alert.

    Here on the farm we have to be very alert. Since we currently have eight dogs that roam the hill, we have eight times the chances of getting up close and personal with the all too recognizable skunk.

    This very evening, as I typed, we had a too close encounter. Luckily, I got all eight inside in time.

  • You know those people who love their pets more than anything? The ones who treat Fido and Fluffy like their own flesh and blood? The ones who can relate everything in life back to the cutest thing little Spike did last weekend?

    I used to make fun of those people, but now I’m one of them.

    Josh and I have had our lovely Lily — a 50-pound, 7-month-old lab — since early November, and I can’t imagine our life without her.

    In fact, I had a little taste of that life this past weekend, and I didn’t care for it.

  • Some newspaper industry wonks say the measure of a paper’s success lies almost exclusively with its bottom line.

    Perhaps, but nothing offers a more accurate measure of a newspaper’s health than the letters and correspondence it receives from readers.

    Over the past year, this page has gone from one letter a week (if that) to at least several or more in nearly every edition.

  • Stimulus plan ‘fundamentally flawed’

    To the editor:

    I know that our illustrious leaders in Washington have their thoughts on getting control of the economy, but there are a few general flaws that I believe they have overlooked.

    I am not an economist and I don’t claim to be, but here are a few things that I feel is wrong with the stimulus bill.

    Not addressing the real issue

  • When I decided to join the Lawrenceburg Skate Park committee with my mother in honor of my brother’s memory, I knew I was doing something good for my community and the youth that live here.

    However, I did not know where this journey was going to lead me.

    I have been amazed at the wonderful people that I have met, the encouragement I have received from friends, family and even people in this community that I did not know before getting involved.

  • Today marks my 366th day as a reporter with The Anderson News. Because last year was a leap year and all, it’s my one-year anniversary.

    Some amazing things have happened to me in the past year, and all those things started when I agreed to take this job. I’ve moved, gotten married, found a new best friend, adopted a dog, met hundreds of wonderful people and written many stories that — at the very least — have been fun for me.

  • President Obama wants to push part of his $1 trillion so-called stimulus package into infrastructure and I have a terrific place for him to start.

    Forget roads and bridges and the rest. Though important, they’re mostly usable.

    What isn’t particularly usable (or sensible, for that matter) is the goofy way we all hook up to the electric grid.

    If the recent ice storm didn’t convince you of that, I don’t know what will.

  • Are you tired of hearing about the economy? I am, but more than that, I’m tired of hearing all the rhetoric between the various parties involved as they jockey for position and spout how their plan is for the people.

    President Obama is seen just about everywhere talking about his plan and the need to pass it and to pass it yesterday, and his fellow Democrats are stepping up to vilify those that have any opposition.

  • Most cattle producers happily waved good-bye to 2008, while crossing their fingers that 2009 will be much better. Many are wrestling with challenging management decisions as a result of the profitability challenges they are facing.

    Production costs were extremely high in 2008 and feeder cattle prices fell dramatically from summer to winter.  However, it is difficult to make clear recommendations about strategies without good knowledge of the cost structure of the farm.

  • Boy, it’s a good thing county law prevents Brody’s from serving alcohol on Sundays.

    Otherwise there might have been a big crowd of people out there to watch the Super Bowl, watching the game and (gasp!) drinking alcohol.

    Thankfully, calmer, more rational people have saved those sinners from their own weaknesses by maintaining a county law that forbids businesses outside city limits from serving alcohol on Sundays.

  • We drink potentially contaminated water during boil water advisories.

    We’re at the mercy of a handful of tornado sirens to warn us when a twister is on its way.

    Rail cars loaded with God-knows-what rumble each day through the heart of our city mere yards from schools and homes, not to mention police and fire departments.

    The common thread with each of these risks is that when or if they occur, our city and county governments have no effective means with which to warn us.

    Isn’t that special?

  • Much has been said about the availability of credit in today’s world of troubled markets, failing businesses and loan losses.

    Credit is certainly still available, but in seeking a loan you need to visit your prospective lender armed with a proposal that is reasonable and easily understood by the loan officer.

    You need to address, in a written business plan, what are referred to as the “Five Cs of Credit,” namely character, capacity, conditions, capital and collateral.

    Character

  • Are you getting the itch? Join the crowd.

    February is almost here and seeds will soon hit the dirt. It doesn’t matter that the dirt is in pots.

    Whether you want to be the first on the block to harvest or you just want to lower your grocery bill ASAP, you can get a head start by starting from seeds or cuttings.

    If you brought some plants inside to overwinter then you can start some cuttings now in pots. Good potting soil and sharp scissors are a good start. A rooting compound is helpful but not essential.