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Opinion

  • Most folks have wishes for the new year, and the staff at The Anderson News is no different.

    Below, members of our staff offer their wishes for 2009, a year we all hope is better than 2008 in many ways.

    Remember, we’re asking for your wishes, too. Just e-mail them to sbrock@theandersonnews.com for publication in next week’s paper.

    Shannon Mason Brock, staff writer

  • If you’re anything like me — and most people I have talked to are, at least in this respect — you’re sitting around wondering where the last week has gone and why it took Christmas with it.

    I don’t know if it’s because we’re so busy this time of year, going to this house and eating at that one, but Christmas just seems to fly by. I so look forward to it arriving and getting to spend time with family and friends, but before I even have time to catch my breath, it’s gone.

  • It’s possible that a stray article or two with my byline will appear in some future edition of this newspaper, but today’s column will be the last one I write as an employee of The Anderson News.

    This is my final week at the paper, as I’ve accepted a position in a different line of work and start my new job Jan. 5.

    It seems impossible, but more than six years have passed since my first article was published back in August 2002. Since then, I’ve penned approximately 2,000 others.

  • Considering it’s a little after noon on Monday, and I’m writing this column several hours before an impending winter storm, perhaps it’s fitting that the song running through my head right now begins with the words, “Oh, the weather outside is frightful…”

  • Somewhere in the neighborhood of 15 years ago, a little girl earned her way onto Santa's naughty list.

    All she wanted for Christmas that year was a keyboard. She loved to sing and wanted to learn to play the keyboard to round out her musical talent. She put in her request to her mom, dad, aunts, uncles and even Old Saint Nick.

    As the days passed by and Christmas morning grew closer, she was bursting at the seams to know if the keyboard would somehow find its way under her tree.

  • Editor’s note: The following is an 1897 letter printed in the New York Sun and the reply given by veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church. It has since become history’s most reprinted newspaper editorial. It appears here courtesy of newseum.org.

    Dear Editor: I am 8 years old.

    Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus.

    Papa says, "If you see it in The Sun it's so."

    Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus?

    Virginia O’Hanlon

    115 West Ninety-Fifth Street

  • Children thankful for returned parade ribbon

    To the editor:

    We want to thank the nice person who turned in our second place Christmas parade ribbon.

    We wish we knew who he was so we could thank him personally.

    We also want to thank Lawrenceburg Mayor Edwinna Baker for calling us with the good news and giving us the ribbon back last week. Madeleine the reindeer goat thanks you, too!

    Rio and Quetzal Velasco

    Lawrenceburg

    Septic users must comply with pumping regulations

    To the editor:

  • The Night Before Christmas

    (at the White House)

    'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the nation

    Not a creature was stirring, due to economic stagnation

    A list of woes was hung by the chimney with care,

    In hopes that Obama would soon be there;

    The twins were nestled all snug in their beds,

    While visions of bourbon balls danced in their heads

    And mamma in her 'kerchief' eating a wrap

    Had just settled down with the world's biggest sap

    When out on the lawn there arose such a howl,

  • Column as I see ’em...

    A question for those of you who think the answer for America’s auto industry woes is for the Big Three to build electric cars: What happens when tens of millions of people pull into their driveways after work and plug them in?

    Might not be too terrible a problem here, but when it’s 90 degrees on the West Coast, California already experiences brown outs due to its aging and inadequate electric grid.

    Ditto the Northeast.

  • I never thought I could become a Southern Cal football fan. Maybe it’s because of the way they repeatedly run roughshod over my University of Michigan Wolverines in the Rose Bowl.

    It wasn’t always that way. The Michiganders swamped the Trojans 49-0 in the 1949 Rose Bowl. But that’s ancient history and I didn’t become a Wolverine fan until the 1970s when I moved to Michigan. Since then it has been all University of Southern California. They whipped U of M 14-3 in 1970, 14-6 in 1972, 28-14 in 2004, and 32-18 two years ago.

  • In dribs and drabs, Lawrenceburg’s business community is shrinking nearly every week as small businesses continue to go under.

    As a community, we can sit back and wait for someone in Frankfort or Washington, D.C., to sprinkle pixie dust on the economy and get it back on track, or we can take matters into our own hands.

  • A Mountain Dew sits to my left and a bag of Doritos sits behind it. When I go home tonight, I know that I’ll either have something to cook for dinner or the money to go to the grocery store and find it.

    I say this not to remind you of how much junk food I eat, but to remind you that I’m one of the lucky ones — I have food to eat.

    A very giving group of people — led by Tamara Williams — is hosting a dinner tomorrow night at Emma B. Ward Elementary as a fundraiser for those who aren’t so lucky.

  • Unlike my wife, who can trace her heritage directly to ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War, I don’t know a whole lot about my family’s history.

    I know that my ancestors migrated from Virginia to Kentucky a couple hundred years ago and that they were originally from Great Britain and Ireland. But I don’t know much else about my forefathers.

  • Does anyone else find it more than a little bizarre that so many heretofore ardent capitalists have turned to a form of socialism to bail out Wall Street, big banking and possibly the big three auto companies?

    But that is exactly what has been happening since the massive financial meltdown began.

    And why is it that when poor folks receive government assistance the well-to-do label it as welfare, but those same moneyed people think it’s OK when their failing businesses receive welfare in the form of a government handout/bailout?

  • God has a special mold from which he creates firefighters.

    There can be no other rational explanation for why people who otherwise appear completely sane and in command of their facilities would willingly enter burning buildings and risk their lives for, usually, the mere belongings of people they often don’t even know.

    So what drives these men and women from virtually every walk and station in life to show up at the local fire hall and volunteer?

  • To write love on her arms.

    I’d seen those six words in pictures, on T-shirts, in advertisements and on websites too many times to count. “Those aren’t just a random set of words,” I’ve thought to myself. “There has to be a meaning behind them.”

    But as often happens, my mind would wander and I’d quickly forget those six words until the next time I saw them somewhere. Then, sadly, the process would repeat itself.

  • Katie Birdwhistell is a girl after my own heart, and her classmates aren’t half bad either.

    What started as a lack of an idea for Katie, turned out to be a great one — for her and the rest of Jennifer Sea’s third grade class at Robert B. Turner Elementary School.

  • If you want the cold hard facts about what will soon be 100 foreclosures in Anderson County this year, go back to page A1 and read all about it.

    Stay here and you will read about two of the faces behind one of those foreclosures, and how their charitable act last Christmas Day placed their home on the foreclosure list, ruined their credit and has wreaked havoc on their lives.

  • I don’t like telemarketing. Never have, never will. Telemarketers who call and try to convince me to purchase their goods or services are wasting their time.

    So are those who call and urge me to contribute to the local firemen’s or policemen’s organization, or to save the children, or for cancer, AIDS or Alzheimer’s disease research or for any of the other causes that need money.

  • Thumbs down to the state’s transportation cabinet for still not having 45 mph speed limit signs on U.S. 127 Bypass. Extending the speed limit past the new elementary school made good sense, but it’s hard to understand why the cabinet yanked out the 55 mph signs just past the park entrance and didn’t replace them with 45 mph signs. The only warning northbound drivers receive that the speed limit is reduced is at Carlton Drive just south of Kroger. Those who enter 127 from Broadway, Highway 44 or any of the smaller streets and head north have no way of knowing the limit.