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Opinion

  • Thumbs down to the state’s transportation cabinet for still not having 45 mph speed limit signs on U.S. 127 Bypass. Extending the speed limit past the new elementary school made good sense, but it’s hard to understand why the cabinet yanked out the 55 mph signs just past the park entrance and didn’t replace them with 45 mph signs. The only warning northbound drivers receive that the speed limit is reduced is at Carlton Drive just south of Kroger. Those who enter 127 from Broadway, Highway 44 or any of the smaller streets and head north have no way of knowing the limit.

  • Not counting today, it’s 36 days until Christmas.

    Even though Thanksgiving comes first and I’m looking forward to my four-day weekend, Christmas is still the holiday on my mind.

    Just to warn you, this column might be a bit sappy and a bit personal, so if you’re one of those people who doesn’t like that sort of thing, go ahead and flip the page or read whatever falls below or next to this. I promise, I don’t mind.

    Christmas 2008 will be much different than what I’m used to.

  • When a team is a player short and needs a sub, a good coach will always put his best available player in the game.

    Let’s hope Gov. Steve Beshear follows that philosophy and selects Anthony Stratton to fill outgoing 4th District Magistrate Jason Denny’s seat on the Anderson County Fiscal Court.

    Denny is leaving the court after winning the county clerk’s seat last Tuesday and as of Tuesday morning, Beshear had not named his replacement.

  • Editor’s note: The following was written by the late John Boggs Jr. of Lawrenceburg, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II.

    While sitting in church surrounded by my family, grandchildren and friends, I am so grateful for my freedom of worship, freedom of speech, freedom from fear and freedom from want.

    Having spent my lifetime in a democratic society and enjoying all of the freedoms, it is so easy to take for granted these values the rest of the world is so envious of.

  • I’ve never been prouder to be an American than I’ve been since Barack Obama was declared president-elect last week.

    I supported Obama, but that’s not the reason for my pride. I’m proud because the election of a qualified black man signifies that our nation has finally taken a giant step toward making amends for our past racial transgressions.

  • A very pleasant but obviously unhappy lady called me Friday to object to the number of harvested deer and other wildlife photos that appeared in last week’s paper.

    She is a long-time subscriber but made it clear that if dead animal photos continue to be printed, she most certainly will not renew her subscription again.

    To slugs like me who sell newspapers, that’s like hearing nails on a chalkboard.

  • Political campaigning that unmercifully seemed to go on forever finally concluded Tuesday. The mudslinging from both parties was brutal. But modern-era campaign shenanigans pale in comparison to the political hi-jinks perpetrated by some shirttail relatives of a Lawrenceburg man who, in 1912, came very close to being elected president of the United States.

  • I never thought I could be so excited about someone going No. 2 — yes, that No. 2.

    But when it’s a dog and the act is happening outside instead of in your kitchen floor, living room or car, it’s darn near worth shouting about.

    Josh and I welcomed Lily, our 32-pound bouncing, baby yellow lab, into our home last week. She’s 5 months old, and for the next few years, she’s the closest thing to a baby we’re going to have. But as I’m finding out, having a dog is a lot closer to having a baby that one might think.

  • I tell my friends some things my husband would never tell his.

    Things like, “I love you,” “I miss you,” and “I can’t wait to see you.”

  • In 1992, I voted for Ross Perot. I was just a few days from turning 8 years old, and I was in the second grade.

    Obviously, it didn't count for anything and, as you might expect, my political reasoning wasn't very advanced. I feel pretty confident saying I had no idea what he stood for, and I had very little knowledge of America's party system or its election process.

    I'm pretty sure I voted for Perot because I felt sorry for him. Out of the three "most popular" candidates, he had the least support, from what I'd heard. So I voted for him.

  • Stevens is sincere, hardworking

    To the editor:

     

    This letter of recommendation is gladly written on behalf of a long-time good personal friend, Kent Stevens.

     

    Quite candidly, I met Kent several years ago while buying feed for my cattle. I was most impressed with his friendly attitude and it immediately enabled us to establish what has become a lasting friendship. I would say from my continued relationship over the years with Kent that he certainly has the qualities of a great leader.

     

  • I occasionally receive a copy of the latest book authored by someone who has Kentucky connections. I’m an avid reader, so I usually read the book if the author is from Anderson County or if it seems potentially interesting.

    During my six years with The Anderson News, I’ve perused and then written my impressions of about a couple dozen books that have been sent or dropped off at our office. Some were pretty good reads, some not so much.

    Recently, I received one of the better ones in the mail.

  • You really shouldn’t be concerned if Obama or McCain is our next president.

    You shouldn’t but have to be thanks to how much power the federal government has seized from states — and states from communities — via judicial fiat.

    Had the feds left states alone and the Constitution been obeyed, who wins the upcoming races for city council and school board would be your primary concern, because it’s those people who would have a direct affect on your life. Ditto the McConnell-Lunsford race for the Senate.

  • Lost amid the buzz over Obama vs. McCain and Denny vs. Stratton is the fact that for the first time in a generation Harold Ritchey won't preside over Tuesday's election results.

    Ritchey, the beloved county clerk who passed away this summer while jogging on Broadway, was Anderson County's Rock of Gibraltar when it came to election night, and Tuesday just won't be the same without him.

    As enamored of his job as he was, Ritchey always seemed to love election night more than any other duty he so flawlessly performed.

  • Election day is finally just around the corner and not a minute too soon.

    I'm not certain I could endure another month of the mindless propaganda that has inundated the American public for the last several months.

    Ethics in politics seems to have gone the way of the passenger pigeon and great auk.

    If they have not accomplished much else, at least the continuing negative attack ads that have been launched at us like kamikaze pilots attacking a battleship, have caused me to wonder about many things political including:

  • A lot of attention has recently been paid to my cooking skills, or lack thereof.

    During my last visit to Pineville, one of Josh’s aunts playfully asked when I was going to cook her family dinner in all of the new cookware I received before the wedding. I told her she and her family were welcome to come to Lexington for a meal at our house any time, but not to expect me to be the one frying the chicken or baking the dessert.

  • As far as I can recall, I’ve only had the flu once in the past 20 years, maybe longer. It isn’t that I’m any healthier than most other people or that my immune system is better. It’s probably because I almost always get a flu shot.

    The Center for Disease Control recommends annual flu shots for children age 6 months to 19 years, pregnant women, people 50 years of age or older or who have certain chronic medical conditions, or people who live in nursing homes or who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from the flu.

  • The notion that Anderson County should remain a bedroom community has been issued a death sentence, and not a moment too soon.

    For decades our leaders and those bent on making fortunes on residential real estate have shunned industry and the tax base it provides.

    Don’t believe us? Then name one other county in the Bluegrass that hasn’t acquired a spin-off business since Toyota arrived in Georgetown all those years ago.

    You can’t because there aren’t any.

  • Cory Grant is the only person from Anderson County who has hiked the entire 2,170-mile-long Appalachian Trail, which extends from Georgia to Maine.

    When he thru-hiked the AT in August 2005, he vowed to return in the future. He recently kept the promise he made to himself and repeated the 280-mile section that runs through Maine.

    But unlike the first trek when he traveled most of the trail alone, Cory had a hiking partner on his recent hike. And he intends to travel life's trails with this partner from now on.

  • I just love the smell of dead leaves.

    It sounds a little creepy, but it's true. And up until a couple weeks ago, I hadn't really realized what I was smelling.

    My husband and I were at Veteran's Park in Lexington enjoying a lovely evening and sauntering along the walking path.

    I took a deep breath and made a comment something like, "I just love the smell of fall. I can't really describe it, but there's just a smell, and when you smell it, you know it's fall."