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Opinion

  • A Mountain Dew sits to my left and a bag of Doritos sits behind it. When I go home tonight, I know that I’ll either have something to cook for dinner or the money to go to the grocery store and find it.

    I say this not to remind you of how much junk food I eat, but to remind you that I’m one of the lucky ones — I have food to eat.

    A very giving group of people — led by Tamara Williams — is hosting a dinner tomorrow night at Emma B. Ward Elementary as a fundraiser for those who aren’t so lucky.

  • Unlike my wife, who can trace her heritage directly to ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War, I don’t know a whole lot about my family’s history.

    I know that my ancestors migrated from Virginia to Kentucky a couple hundred years ago and that they were originally from Great Britain and Ireland. But I don’t know much else about my forefathers.

  • Does anyone else find it more than a little bizarre that so many heretofore ardent capitalists have turned to a form of socialism to bail out Wall Street, big banking and possibly the big three auto companies?

    But that is exactly what has been happening since the massive financial meltdown began.

    And why is it that when poor folks receive government assistance the well-to-do label it as welfare, but those same moneyed people think it’s OK when their failing businesses receive welfare in the form of a government handout/bailout?

  • God has a special mold from which he creates firefighters.

    There can be no other rational explanation for why people who otherwise appear completely sane and in command of their facilities would willingly enter burning buildings and risk their lives for, usually, the mere belongings of people they often don’t even know.

    So what drives these men and women from virtually every walk and station in life to show up at the local fire hall and volunteer?

  • To write love on her arms.

    I’d seen those six words in pictures, on T-shirts, in advertisements and on websites too many times to count. “Those aren’t just a random set of words,” I’ve thought to myself. “There has to be a meaning behind them.”

    But as often happens, my mind would wander and I’d quickly forget those six words until the next time I saw them somewhere. Then, sadly, the process would repeat itself.

  • Katie Birdwhistell is a girl after my own heart, and her classmates aren’t half bad either.

    What started as a lack of an idea for Katie, turned out to be a great one — for her and the rest of Jennifer Sea’s third grade class at Robert B. Turner Elementary School.

  • If you want the cold hard facts about what will soon be 100 foreclosures in Anderson County this year, go back to page A1 and read all about it.

    Stay here and you will read about two of the faces behind one of those foreclosures, and how their charitable act last Christmas Day placed their home on the foreclosure list, ruined their credit and has wreaked havoc on their lives.

  • I don’t like telemarketing. Never have, never will. Telemarketers who call and try to convince me to purchase their goods or services are wasting their time.

    So are those who call and urge me to contribute to the local firemen’s or policemen’s organization, or to save the children, or for cancer, AIDS or Alzheimer’s disease research or for any of the other causes that need money.

  • Thumbs down to the state’s transportation cabinet for still not having 45 mph speed limit signs on U.S. 127 Bypass. Extending the speed limit past the new elementary school made good sense, but it’s hard to understand why the cabinet yanked out the 55 mph signs just past the park entrance and didn’t replace them with 45 mph signs. The only warning northbound drivers receive that the speed limit is reduced is at Carlton Drive just south of Kroger. Those who enter 127 from Broadway, Highway 44 or any of the smaller streets and head north have no way of knowing the limit.

  • Not counting today, it’s 36 days until Christmas.

    Even though Thanksgiving comes first and I’m looking forward to my four-day weekend, Christmas is still the holiday on my mind.

    Just to warn you, this column might be a bit sappy and a bit personal, so if you’re one of those people who doesn’t like that sort of thing, go ahead and flip the page or read whatever falls below or next to this. I promise, I don’t mind.

    Christmas 2008 will be much different than what I’m used to.

  • When a team is a player short and needs a sub, a good coach will always put his best available player in the game.

    Let’s hope Gov. Steve Beshear follows that philosophy and selects Anthony Stratton to fill outgoing 4th District Magistrate Jason Denny’s seat on the Anderson County Fiscal Court.

    Denny is leaving the court after winning the county clerk’s seat last Tuesday and as of Tuesday morning, Beshear had not named his replacement.

  • Editor’s note: The following was written by the late John Boggs Jr. of Lawrenceburg, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II.

    While sitting in church surrounded by my family, grandchildren and friends, I am so grateful for my freedom of worship, freedom of speech, freedom from fear and freedom from want.

    Having spent my lifetime in a democratic society and enjoying all of the freedoms, it is so easy to take for granted these values the rest of the world is so envious of.

  • I’ve never been prouder to be an American than I’ve been since Barack Obama was declared president-elect last week.

    I supported Obama, but that’s not the reason for my pride. I’m proud because the election of a qualified black man signifies that our nation has finally taken a giant step toward making amends for our past racial transgressions.

  • A very pleasant but obviously unhappy lady called me Friday to object to the number of harvested deer and other wildlife photos that appeared in last week’s paper.

    She is a long-time subscriber but made it clear that if dead animal photos continue to be printed, she most certainly will not renew her subscription again.

    To slugs like me who sell newspapers, that’s like hearing nails on a chalkboard.

  • Political campaigning that unmercifully seemed to go on forever finally concluded Tuesday. The mudslinging from both parties was brutal. But modern-era campaign shenanigans pale in comparison to the political hi-jinks perpetrated by some shirttail relatives of a Lawrenceburg man who, in 1912, came very close to being elected president of the United States.

  • I never thought I could be so excited about someone going No. 2 — yes, that No. 2.

    But when it’s a dog and the act is happening outside instead of in your kitchen floor, living room or car, it’s darn near worth shouting about.

    Josh and I welcomed Lily, our 32-pound bouncing, baby yellow lab, into our home last week. She’s 5 months old, and for the next few years, she’s the closest thing to a baby we’re going to have. But as I’m finding out, having a dog is a lot closer to having a baby that one might think.

  • I tell my friends some things my husband would never tell his.

    Things like, “I love you,” “I miss you,” and “I can’t wait to see you.”

  • In 1992, I voted for Ross Perot. I was just a few days from turning 8 years old, and I was in the second grade.

    Obviously, it didn't count for anything and, as you might expect, my political reasoning wasn't very advanced. I feel pretty confident saying I had no idea what he stood for, and I had very little knowledge of America's party system or its election process.

    I'm pretty sure I voted for Perot because I felt sorry for him. Out of the three "most popular" candidates, he had the least support, from what I'd heard. So I voted for him.

  • Stevens is sincere, hardworking

    To the editor:

     

    This letter of recommendation is gladly written on behalf of a long-time good personal friend, Kent Stevens.

     

    Quite candidly, I met Kent several years ago while buying feed for my cattle. I was most impressed with his friendly attitude and it immediately enabled us to establish what has become a lasting friendship. I would say from my continued relationship over the years with Kent that he certainly has the qualities of a great leader.

     

  • I occasionally receive a copy of the latest book authored by someone who has Kentucky connections. I’m an avid reader, so I usually read the book if the author is from Anderson County or if it seems potentially interesting.

    During my six years with The Anderson News, I’ve perused and then written my impressions of about a couple dozen books that have been sent or dropped off at our office. Some were pretty good reads, some not so much.

    Recently, I received one of the better ones in the mail.