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Opinion

  • To the editor:

    The Lawrenceburg Skate Park Committee would like to give a large round of applause to Ben Carlson, editor for The Anderson News.

    Thank you, Ben, for being interested and generous toward our cause.

    Thank you for all of your help with skate park updates, and coverage of events including Anderson County youth who are writing essays on "Why We Need a Skate Park in Lawrenceburg," and for your generosity of donating five one-year subscriptions to The Anderson News for our raffles, held at the Burgoo Festival.

  • It goes without saying that the world has no shortage of repugnant, awful people.

    Given my chosen profession, I happen across at least my fair share of those people, most of which are foul-mouthed agitators bent on telling me why they or someone they know shouldn't be listed in the paper's court docket or some such nonsense.

    I have never lost a moment's sleep over those people, mostly because along with their charges, we also print the outcomes of their cases. In short, if you're charged, it's in the paper; when you're exonerated or found guilty, that's in there, too.

  • To the editor:

    I hope that everyone in Lawrenceburg and Anderson County will make the skate park a reality.

    With the help of the good Lord, we can get this skate park done soon by working and giving.

    Thank you, and thank God.

    Billy K. Thornton

    Lawrenceburg

  • To the editor:

    I would like to comment on the folks who don't want to pay to have their refrigerators, TVs, couches and mattresses taken away or mess with it themselves.

    We live in the beautiful country area. We love it here. Why do you want to dump your unwanted things on our roadsides? The deer and turkey just can't figure out what to do with it.

    It is enough that we have to deal with the folks dropping kittens, puppies, old dogs and cats and any other animals they don't want. We can't take them all.

  • To the editor:

    Yep, a skate park is going to be great for about a quarter of the youth population around age 8 to 19.

    Sure a few older folks will probably use it, too. I hope they have insurance and ibuprofen.

    But what about the rest of us age 4 weeks to 100 years?

    A pool would be a beneficial and fun source of exercise. Not a "fancy nancy" water park designed for toddlers and small children that would cost a lot.

  • Nowadays, I'm just working part-time at The Anderson News. While I do enjoy the additional time to myself, there is at least one downside-I have way too much time available to contemplate things that bug me but over which I have no control.

    While I can't control these things, I can fantasize about dealing with them when I'm king. Here are a few.

  • My cousin April is lucky to be alive, and she'd be the first person to say so.

    A few months ago, she was on a motorcycle day trip with her boyfriend. He was driving the bike, and two of their friends were following close behind on another bike.

    The same four people and the same two bikes had made the same exact trip the weekend before, but both bikes hit a rough patch of gravel this time around sending all four riders to the emergency room.

  • To the editor:

    Just wanted to give a shout out for the Anderson County Road Department for repairing Lanes Mill Road.

    Thanks goes to road foreman Chip Chambers and crew for a job well done.

    Scott Frasier

    Lawrenceburg

  • When I cried, Kirby always stayed close, comforting me without words.

    The first time I lived by myself, Kirby made sure I wasn't completely alone. When my heart was broken, she reminded me that I could always count on her. If I was too busy to spend as much time as usual with her, she was happy just to see me when I showed up again.

  • We now have 1.2 million reasons to be optimistic about the possibility of new jobs and industry finally making their mutual way to Anderson County.

    That's the number of dollar bills soon to be neatly stacked in the Economic Development Authority's bank account, courtesy of the privately held Industrial Foundation's decision to disband and hand over its dough.

  • I haven't had an interesting weekend to write about in a while, but this past one was chock full of entertainment. OK, so maybe not "chock full," but for an old married person like me, it was entertaining.

    At the very least it taught me a few lessons:

    Two Shannons aren't necessarily braver than one

    My friend Shannon and I took Friday evening to enjoy a little "Shannon time." While the hubby was studying back home in Lexington, she and I had dinner and ice cream in Frankfort.

  • Test scores have been on the minds of a lot of folks as of late, especially those with children in public schools.

    Most media attention tends to focus on the local schools' progress in meeting academic goals so that the schools can be compared with ones in neighboring communities, or so one state's progress can be matched against another state's.

    Not nearly as much ink is spent on student dropout rates. Perhaps it should be. While Kentucky has made progress, it continues to have one of the nation's highest dropout rates.

  • The right to private property is a great thing ... heck, an American thing.

    But no matter how much property a person owns, it's still stitched to someone else's and we are all accountable to each other to take care of what we own.

    A story in this week's paper serves as a microcosm of how one person's reluctance to maintain his property affects those around him. His back yard is replete with junked vehicles, piles of scrap lumber and other items that are an eyesore.

    His front yard isn't much better.

  • If recent newspaper articles about the scandal involving former University of Louisville's College of Education Dean Robert Felner are accurate, school president James Ramsey has some serious fence mending to do with his faculty.

    Felner is no longer with the university and is currently being investigated by the feds for alleged misappropriation of grant money. By most published accounts, he is not a pleasant person.

  • Column as I see 'em ...

    For all the grumbling and griping about local government, it's amazing that so few people are running for the available city council and school board seats this fall. There is zero competition for three school board seats, and only eight candidates (four of which are incumbents) gunning for six seats on the city council. At a time of year when yards are generally stuffed with signs begging for votes, I've spotted nary a one for school board or city council.

  • Last week my wife and I celebrated our 40th wedding anniversary.

    Other than exchanging cards and perhaps going out to dinner, we usually don't do anything special or exchange gifts on our anniversaries.

    But realizing that I needed do something extra for this anniversary, since staying together for so long has become increasingly rare, I purchased her a set of nice ruby earrings. (I looked on the Internet and discovered that the 40th is the "ruby" anniversary and it's also her birthstone.)

  • What to do when both people running for a seat in the United States Senate are simply unacceptable?

    That's my dilemma when it comes to choosing between "please elect me to something" challenger Bruce Lunsford (D) and four-term incumbent mealy mouth Mitch McConnell (R).

    What a choice.

  • I admit being none too happy when I saw the little car with Indiana tags and trailer behind it clogging up the area in front of the gas pumps.

    It was Sunday, I was late getting stuff home for dinner and nearly out of gas, but the cheap thrill of pumping marginally cheaper gas suckered me in, and into the chaos I drove.

  • If Steve Cornish is feeling haunted lately, I know a likely suspect.

    The way things have been going between the county judge-executive and the Anderson Humane Society, I'm surprised Ann Garrison hasn't exploded from her place in Lawrenceburg Cemetery and planted herself permanently in Cornish's office.

    Decades ago, my mother-in-law founded the local Humane Society on sheer determination. Ann understood our duty as a compassionate society to look out for those among us who are unable to care for themselves.

  • After a two-month hiatus, I returned to The Anderson News on Monday.

    As is frequently the case when one takes an extended break from work, several colleagues couldn't wait to rib me about returning to the daily grind.

    "Are you surviving your first day back?" asked one colleague at about noon. "Did you have a hard time getting up this morning?" queried another.