.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • The metal crane, with one video camera attached to its arm, slowly panned over the field to capture the sound of cannons, the snicker-snack of cavalry sword against sword and yells from Confederate soldiers as they died.
    The battles of Dogwalk and Lawrenceburg caught on film to be used as the backdrop of a larger love story.
    I’ve attended the Civil War re-enactment in Lawrenceburg for the last three years, listened to Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis trade speeches and steeled myself not to jump when cannons bellowed their first boom.

  • There’s an old adage that says it’s a bad idea to argue with someone who buys ink by the gallon (that would be me).
    It’s also a bad idea to get into a prank war with someone like me, particularly when the prank involves purchasing an ad in The Anderson News Extra that pokes fun at me for turning 50 this week.
    Cheri Johnson, a health department nurse who fancies herself Lawrenceburg’s Queen of Pranks, did just that, placing an ad in Monday’s Extra in a somewhat lame attempt to exact a measure of revenge for a crime I did not commit.

  • Because I work for an Anderson County institution that has been in operation since the late 1800s, I feel it’s my duty to appreciate the reporters, designers and proofreaders who came before me by taking a trip into The Anderson News archives.  
    I recently got my hands on a bound archive of the paper from 1973, and I realized something.
    Well, two things.

  • Good people die nearly every day in Anderson County.
    From age to disease to accidents, people beloved by their friends and families are taken too soon no matter their age, leaving mourners in their wake and questions about why God takes them from our lives.
    Most, through no fault of their own, go largely unnoticed outside of their immediate circle of loved ones. Others, for whatever reason, leave a deeper impression on those around them — not for any tangible reason, just because they do.

  • She’s found strange things on the school bus.
    Usually it’s costume jewelry, band instruments and orphaned cleats forgotten under seats until Rita Edington walks down to clean the aisles.
    Bus 27 is her bus, the only bus she ever drove for 25 1/2 years.
    But once, she found a ring.
    A mother’s ring.
    And Rita has wondered about this mother for more than a decade.
    Rita never removes the gold band on her pinkie finger.

  • “Shallow men believe in luck or in circumstance. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”
    —Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Since giving my youngest daughter’s hand in marriage last Friday afternoon, I’ve thought a lot about the idea of being lucky.
    I’ve never been one to believe in luck, and often bristle when I hear that so and so is “lucky” because he has a good job or a nice home or whatever.

  • Patriot Day is observed Sept. 11 in memory of the 2,993 people who lost their lives in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks against the United States.
    Anyone who was alive at the time remembers what they were doing when four United States airliners were hijacked by terrorists intent on harming innocent American civilians.

  • You thought you could see the deer breathe.  
    The relaxed buck sat resting among moss and grasses near a fence post, just in front of a rusted sign that once read “Posted: no hunting.”
    Opposite where his competition full-body buck sat in repose, Justin Tinsley smeared glue onto a plastic form of his deer mount before pulling the damp fur of a tanned deer hide or “cape” over the form.
    The cape is important, I learned.

  • To the editor:
    In last week’s letters to the editor, Jerry Salyer claims the ACLU’s “ultimate goal is to purge Kentucky life of the very faith upon which it was built.”
    This quote may be found on the ACLU-Kentucky website at https://www.aclu.org/religion-belief.

  • Stephanie Blackwell’s vision of California is desert and Hollywood.
    She sees flat, open spaces.
    Of course, Blackwell’s never seen California, only heard about Great Aunt Bertie’s orange grove and almond trees, the garden and maybe geese at Bertie’s home in Selma, Calif.
    But after a late summer road trip spanning more than 2,000 miles, an estimated $1,000 budget for gas and about 10 states, California will be her new home for Blackwell and her son, William Smith, age 9 almost 10.

  • I look pretty good in hats.
    And I wear a few of them: features writer, page designer, city government beat reporter and amateur expert in how to cover the Fair and Horse Show pageants.
    In this week’s column, I’ll put on the hat I reserve for education news (not sure what kind of literal hat that would be, but you can use your imagination) in a quick round-up of some interesting education news from the last few weeks.

    God isn’t dead even if we may not be able to pass out Bibles in school

  • I became enraged as I read [sports editor] John Herndon’s column entitled “What happened to decency?” concerning the recent bill passed in California that protects transgender students’ right to choose the gendered sport and locker room that matches their gender identity.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    It’s a shame that after years of effort and no small amount of compromise the new sign ordinance being proposed by the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce does absolutely nothing to fix the current ordinance’s fatal flaw.
    Not that the chamber could do a thing about that flaw, which is simply that two zoning boards of adjustments — one city, one county — can override the ordinance at will by granting waivers.

  • I must be insane to be standing here, taking a photo of the courthouse at 12:45 a.m.
    Let’s be clear here: I am not a night owl.
    The night, even last Saturday night with its sleepy August cricket chirps and lingering smoke of dinner barbecues, does not appeal to me.
    You will not find me conscious at midnight, sitting outside on a porch on a warm summer night to contemplate life after all the lights have been snuffed out except for the moon.
    I like sleep. I love sleep.

  • I recently had a very serious talk with my 12-year-old daughter.

    We were driving to Louisville on US 60, west of Simpsonville, when I pulled into what is now known as the Whitney Young Job Corps Center.

    Fifty years ago, however, it was simply known as Lincoln Institute.

    We didn’t get out of the car, just drove around the campus while I told her how Lincoln Institute existed as a school for African-American children because most communities would not allow them to attend the local schools.

  • I can tell you exactly what high school senior Emily Gritton will be eating tonight: a steak dinner with potatoes and a “Malone’s restaurant style” salad.
    Emily’s mother, Crystal Gritton, said Monday that she makes her two daughters, Emily and Whitney, their favorite foods for dinner to celebrate the first day of school.
    Emily will be in the kitchen do the same for her mom on Aug. 29, the first day of classes for Crystal at the University of Kentucky.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    In retrospect, it’s not at all difficult to see why a representative of the company proposing the Bluegrass Pipeline opted out of attending last Tuesday’s special called meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    One person at that meeting, for one brief moment, spoke out of lockstep with the crowd and was immediately and thoroughly drowned out in opposition — even after he said he isn’t in favor of the pipeline.

  • We (by we, I mean The Anderson News) get many requests to look into spending in local governments and other taxing districts.  
    Some of these concerns are warranted (the fiscal court allowing the purchase of Creatine for inmates is a notable and recent example).
    And we’ve gotten several requests to research Walmart credit card receipts.
    So we did.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    Some of you will probably call me a hypocrite after reading the article I produced this week about a new fire station in western Anderson County and finding no criticism of it here.
    Of course you’ll be wrong for doing so but everyone is entitled to his or her own opinion, even if it isn’t correct.
    You’ll notice in the article that I quote the fire chief as saying the fire district has been socking away money not spent in its budget each year and has saved a tidy sum toward the new building.

  • Let’s call them Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
    They live in Anderson County.
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith may be your neighbors.
    Mr. Smith will be 65 in August.
    Mrs. Smith is 62.
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith don’t want to be identified by their real names because of you, their neighbors.
    “We don’t want to be looked down on,” Mrs. Smith told me last week.
    Don’t want to appear like they’re looking for a free handout, they said.