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Opinion

  • No money. No aquatic center. Not even a skate park.

    The list of what Anderson County doesn't have often appears to dwarf the list of things it does.

    As a result, residents gripe and politicians grip over our perceived shortcomings and look to each other for solutions.

    "Think outside of the box" we often hear and say, but when was the last time any of us actually did so?

    The folks in Casey County, however, have what appears to be a whiz-bang group of thinkers who are so far outside the box it's a wonder if they can even see the box.

  • To the editor:

    Being in a career that moves me around state to state every few years, we recently settled here in Anderson County.

    It's plain to see that the people are friendly and show a lot of manners when you run into them at church or in the stores around town.

  • As soon as I learned Donald McCaig's sequel to "Gone With the Wind" was due out in November, it was quickly added to my Christmas wish list.

    I must have been a pretty good boy, as the 498-page "Rhett Butler's People" was under our tree Christmas Day. I devoured it in two days.

    Set in the Old South in the years immediately before the Civil War and continuing through the war and into early Reconstruction, both books tell of Southern plantation life and how the war changed that way of life forever.

  • To the editor:

    It's been my experience that most people like to complain more than encourage.

    I have lived in Anderson County my entire life; specifically Corinth Road.

    I remember when there were times that we wouldn't see a county road truck for days after a snow. This past Tuesday the county road truck graded and dropped cinders on our road even before daylight.

    When I proceeded to Highway 512 and then to Highway 395, I found both of those roads un-graded.

  • The Marines, I uttered under my breath, are turning soft.

    While touring the Marine Corps' recruit training depot last week with educators from across Kentucky and West Virginia, the Air Force veteran in me couldn't help but reflect on my own boot camp experiences while listening to drill instructors describe what they can - and can't - do to train recruits.

    The drill instructors said the days of yelling cuss words at recruits that would make, well, a Marine blush, are long gone.

    Running for miles in the rain and mud? Gone.

  • I couldn't help sucking in my gut when the Marine recruiter walked into my office a month or so ago to invite me to boot camp for a week.

    Marines, those rock-ribbed hard-guys with square jawlines, have always had that affect on me.

  • This week's balmy temperatures have me again pondering global warming.

    Contrarian views apparently being a part of my DNA (and likely a decided insight into my personality), I've decided that rather than following Al Gore into a world free of a carbon footprint, I can better serve humanity by stomping my carbon-covered feet just as hard as I can.

    Yep, I'm all for global warming, man-made or otherwise, and here's why.

  • I wish I were 30, 40 or even 50 years old again. On a more practical note, I wish to be able to complete the remaining 1,000 miles of the Appalachian Trail this summer and then be able to find some reasonable employment when I return to the Bluegrass.

    -Jay Cason, staff writer

    In this time of world strife and economic uncertainty, I wish for peace, simplicity of spirit and a greater awareness of love for family and friends.

  • To the editor:

    I was extremely disappointed with the article in your newspaper regarding the Anderson County Boys Soccer program. ("Anderson sports program at top of state ejection list," Page B1 of the Dec. 19 edition.)

    I considered this article an attack on the program, the team and particularly head coach Brett Morris.

    This was unfair but very typical for this newspaper. I was involved with the program from the beginning of coach Morris' coaching career at Anderson County. He was a welcome alternative from previous coaches.

  • School board member Lee Hahn hit the nail right on the head.

    Speaking during last Monday's board of education meeting, Hahn insisted that, when new lines are drawn to determine where students will be assigned to attend elementary school, the decision is final and no waivers will be granted. Period.

    Let's hope the rest of the board agrees and puts to bed the silly notion held by a handful of parents that each of the three elementary schools are not equally qualified to teach our kids.

  • When we joked that Rusty could make a misbehaving computer function properly by standing near it, we weren't necessarily kidding.

    "Rusty magic," I called it. And I just can't believe it's lost forever.

    When Rusty Kiser walked through the doors of The Anderson News more than nine years ago, his long red hair really didn't scream "ultimate technology professional." But it turned out that's exactly what he was.

  • The standing ovation I received during Monday's forum on proposed changes to Saffell Street Elementary School is appreciated.

    Unfortunately, I don't think it was deserved.

    Last week I called out the small group of parents who oppose mingling Saffell students with those from the other two schools because of their wrong-headed fear that doing so will force their children into schools with "county" kids. In short, children these wrong-minded parents consider to be rednecks.

  • The only people who like change, it has been said, are babies with wet diapers.

    Such is the case with proposed changes to the Anderson County school system, as some parents and teachers are crying foul over the board of education's proposal to do what's right for all at the expense of a few and alleviate overcrowding at the middle school.

    The only viable of two options is to convert Saffell Street Elementary School into a fifth- and sixth-grade campus and spread students in grades one through four to the two remaining elementary schools.

  • Gregory Harp Jr. is gone, but his memory will live forever among those who did what they could to help him recover from a devastating accident last summer that shattered his face.

    It's a rare person these days who can so capture the heart of a community. As we conduct our busy lives, the pain and misery of those around us rarely makes a blip on our collective radar screens. That wasnt the case of Gregory, who shared only a small fragment of his life with Anderson Countians but whose circumstances brought us closer together.

  • The coyote began to howl and I knew yet another morning hunt was shot to heck and back.

    After an exciting Saturday afternoon during which my 11-year-old son saw, shot at and missed his first deer, and my 7-year-old observed (and subsequently scared away) a buck chase a doe through the woods, we were primed for Sunday morning and the promise of finally putting some venison in the freezer.

  • Welcome to the holiday season, the craziness has begun.

    Traffic jams, maniac shoppers, frayed nerves and rude behavior will soon become commonplace during what is supposed to be the most wonderful time of the year.

    The key to enjoying the holidays is patience and forgiveness. Forgive those who dont drive well, who cut in line and give you dirty looks. Be patient with those who live in their own world and have no consideration of others. Try not to allow the nitwits to ruin your holiday.

  • If one of my mentors was correct when he repeatedly opined, "When a person stops learning, he starts dying," I don't need to worry about my preordained encounter with the Grim Reaper anytime soon.

    At almost 62, I'm still learning valuable new lessons. Unfortunately, much of the recent lessons-learned might be easily categorized "Should Have Known Better."

  • That a kid on a skateboard was allegedly punched in the face and kicked by an adult shouldn't come as a shock to Anderson Countians.

    Nor should it be a shock in the not-too-distant future when a skater is hit and killed by a vehicle.

    After all, we, the adults of Anderson County, are the ones who collectively have ignored our children's pleas to build them a safe place to skateboard, away from traffic and bar-room bullies who allegedly assault them, as happened last Friday afternoon behind Main Street.

  • War fatigue - the malaise that has turned a nation once chest-thumping proud of its military into one that cares only which political party gets to be in power - is rampant.

    At one time, news from the war front was all this nation cared about. When newscasts weren't giving us the latest from Pacific or European Theaters, we were kept informed by trailers on the silver screen before watching John Wayne or some other Hollywood beefcake lead the charge against the Nazis.

  • Like a lot of other people, I've long had a weird fascination with La Cosa Nostra, the Mafia.

    That widespread fascination existed long before "The Untouchables" hit the small screen in the late 1950s, or Mario Puzo published his American classic "The Godfather" in 1969.

    It probably started in the 1920s and 1930s, when newspapers and radio stations began sensationalizing Italian gangsters with monikers like Frank "The Enforcer" Nitti, Salvatore "Lucky" Luciano, Giuseppe "Joe The Boss" Masseria, and most famous of them all, Alphonse "Scarface Al" Capone.