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Opinion

  • I became enraged as I read [sports editor] John Herndon’s column entitled “What happened to decency?” concerning the recent bill passed in California that protects transgender students’ right to choose the gendered sport and locker room that matches their gender identity.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    It’s a shame that after years of effort and no small amount of compromise the new sign ordinance being proposed by the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce does absolutely nothing to fix the current ordinance’s fatal flaw.
    Not that the chamber could do a thing about that flaw, which is simply that two zoning boards of adjustments — one city, one county — can override the ordinance at will by granting waivers.

  • I must be insane to be standing here, taking a photo of the courthouse at 12:45 a.m.
    Let’s be clear here: I am not a night owl.
    The night, even last Saturday night with its sleepy August cricket chirps and lingering smoke of dinner barbecues, does not appeal to me.
    You will not find me conscious at midnight, sitting outside on a porch on a warm summer night to contemplate life after all the lights have been snuffed out except for the moon.
    I like sleep. I love sleep.

  • I recently had a very serious talk with my 12-year-old daughter.

    We were driving to Louisville on US 60, west of Simpsonville, when I pulled into what is now known as the Whitney Young Job Corps Center.

    Fifty years ago, however, it was simply known as Lincoln Institute.

    We didn’t get out of the car, just drove around the campus while I told her how Lincoln Institute existed as a school for African-American children because most communities would not allow them to attend the local schools.

  • I can tell you exactly what high school senior Emily Gritton will be eating tonight: a steak dinner with potatoes and a “Malone’s restaurant style” salad.
    Emily’s mother, Crystal Gritton, said Monday that she makes her two daughters, Emily and Whitney, their favorite foods for dinner to celebrate the first day of school.
    Emily will be in the kitchen do the same for her mom on Aug. 29, the first day of classes for Crystal at the University of Kentucky.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    In retrospect, it’s not at all difficult to see why a representative of the company proposing the Bluegrass Pipeline opted out of attending last Tuesday’s special called meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    One person at that meeting, for one brief moment, spoke out of lockstep with the crowd and was immediately and thoroughly drowned out in opposition — even after he said he isn’t in favor of the pipeline.

  • We (by we, I mean The Anderson News) get many requests to look into spending in local governments and other taxing districts.  
    Some of these concerns are warranted (the fiscal court allowing the purchase of Creatine for inmates is a notable and recent example).
    And we’ve gotten several requests to research Walmart credit card receipts.
    So we did.

  • Column as I see ’em …
    Some of you will probably call me a hypocrite after reading the article I produced this week about a new fire station in western Anderson County and finding no criticism of it here.
    Of course you’ll be wrong for doing so but everyone is entitled to his or her own opinion, even if it isn’t correct.
    You’ll notice in the article that I quote the fire chief as saying the fire district has been socking away money not spent in its budget each year and has saved a tidy sum toward the new building.

  • Let’s call them Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
    They live in Anderson County.
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith may be your neighbors.
    Mr. Smith will be 65 in August.
    Mrs. Smith is 62.
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith don’t want to be identified by their real names because of you, their neighbors.
    “We don’t want to be looked down on,” Mrs. Smith told me last week.
    Don’t want to appear like they’re looking for a free handout, they said.

  • There will be plenty of dire predictions and scary scenarios on tap when the fiscal court hosts a meeting Tuesday to allow residents to share their views about the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline.
    The meeting begins at 7 p.m. in the basement of the Extension office in the county park.

  • Reader discretion for this column is advised.
    If you are an Anderson County student (some Anderson County teachers may find they feel the same), there is incredibly disturbing information in the following sentence.  
    There are only 21 days between today and the first day of school.
    I know this because I recently dreamed of a tornado (one of my tried and true “school is coming” nightmares) descending upon Lawrenceburg and swallowing up the Bypass.  

  • Column as I see ’em …
    Rather than discuss something negative this week, how about something positive?
    Positive if you share my opinion, that is.
    I have never been more proud to call Anderson County home than I was last Tuesday morning.
    After catching wind that a man dressed in black was walking north on the Bypass while carrying a military-styled rifle (they’re not assault rifles unless used in an assault), I hustled to the location to see what was going on.

  • This was not the day trip to France I imagined.   
    I wanted magic. Flaky croissants floating down from the sky like biblical manna. The “La Vie en Rose” orchestral soundtrack piped through discreet speakers along the Seine River.
    My expectations may have been a little high.
    What I got were a few sleepy minutes stolen in the hotel room to scribble three words in an empty reporter’s notebook —
    “We hated Paris.”

  • Column as I see ’em …
    Here’s something most of you (and I suspect at least several members of the school board) don’t know.
    By the end of next year, local property tax revenue for the school district will have increased by an estimated $612,000 since 2009, a whopping 9 percent jump at a time most folks are happy to simply avoid getting their hourly wages slashed.

  • Don Simmons was shocked when he saw the receipt.
    When the Fairview Drive looked at the total for the hardware he purchased July 4 at Tractor Supply, it came to the $17.76 — the year of our nation’s birth on our nation’s birthday.
    “I thought it was funny, being the year of the American Revolution,” Simmons said Monday by phone. “I asked the clerk, ‘Hey, since you have to work today, are you charging everyone the same amount?’ She laughed in return and agreed that was pretty interesting.”

  • The Mad Hermit of the Hill brings sewing machines back to life in the basement of a spacious, two-story Lawrenceburg log cabin.
    His patients — the black swans of antique Singers and their white and squat modern offspring — wait in queue for Nelson Maynard, the one-stop repair shop at Nelson Maynard Sewing Machine Service and Repair.
    Maynard himself sits perched on a stool in front of a modern Singer 5825 C model, pausing a moment to snap a photo of a common sewing machine problem for his Facebook page.

  • Dear Anderson Public Library Board of Trustees,
    I read in this week’s edition of The Anderson News (see A1) that you are considering hiring a public relations firm to help improve the library’s image.
    Despite being the person viewed by several (or more) of your board members as responsible for creating the library’s negative image in the first place, please consider this letter as official notice that I’m applying for job of repairing it.
    Oh, stop laughing. I’m serious about this!

  • Given the choice, I’d prefer to lick envelopes than type e-mails.
    Letter writing, to me, can still be an art form.
    That’s all it is now, really.  
    You sit down with a carefully chosen piece of stationery and your favorite smooth-inked pen.
    You reflect on the week’s events and write them down unhurriedly, mostly because you’ve now forgotten how to hold a pen.
    You are a modern calligrapher, you tell yourself. Your seasick, unreadable cursive letter will one day be kept behind plated glass, a symbol of a bygone era.

  • Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway will probably have to cheat.
    Again.
    Brian Stivers, the property value administrator who couldn’t hit the ocean from a boat, probably won’t even bother to show up, not after his embarrassing rubber-armed performance last time.
    In fact, I’d be more worried about getting dunked by bunch of 5-year-olds who got cut from a pee wee league team than Stivers or Conway, neither of whom could dunk me the last time I sat in a dunking booth for a good cause.

  • Many men can be fathers, but not all can handle being in the military and maintaining a family.
    Families with fathers in the military must endure a great amount of fear for the one serving, but appreciation for what they are doing.
    The children who live the uncertain military lifestyle can become more resilient as they must patiently wait for mom or dad to return.
    With Father’s Day approaching, we recognize and celebrate the some of those fathers who are not just known as heroes to the many Americans they help protect, they are also known as dad.