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Outdoors

  • Green River gives sense of history, great fishing

    By Lee McClellan

    Ky. Dept. of Fish & Wildlife Resources

    The headwaters of Green River above Green River Lake imprinted historical greatness on the descendants of the earliest settlers of the area.

    Capt. Abraham Lincoln obtained the first recorded land grant in what is now Casey County with 800 acres along the Green River. His 8-year-old son, Thomas, narrowly escaped death during an Indian ambush that killed Capt. Lincoln in 1786. Without Thomas, we would never hear of his son Abraham Lincoln.

  • Catfish spawn brings hot fishing in reservoirs

    By Lee McClellan

    Ky. Dept. of Fish & Wildlife Resources

    Water temperatures are climbing into the upper 70s, sending channel catfish to rocky banks in reservoirs to spawn. June is one of the most productive months to fish for them.

  • Summer is good time for learning nature's way

    By Jeff Lilly, outdoors columnist

    Remember how this past winter just seemed to keep hanging on like a dog to a bone? Well, summer and 90-degree temps have made it to the Bluegrass State. Now we get to go from wishing it would warm up a couple months ago to wishing it would cool down a little. Just remember, it’s Kentucky so hang around a day or two and the weather will change.

    Bats are beneficial, fun to watch

  • Sportsman's Club sponsors archery shoot

    The Anderson County Sportsman's Club will be hosting a 3D Archery Shoot on Sunday, June 29 at the club property on Old Joe Road. The shoot begins at 9 a.m. and will cost $12 per person to shoot for fun, $15 to shoot for points.

    Several classes will also be offered that day.

  • Smallmouth fishing getting stronger as water temps rise

    The stream smallmouth fishing season is in full bloom.

    A late spring following a brutally cold winter caused some hit and miss stream smallmouth fishing this past spring. With the warm winds of June now here, stream smallmouth are settling into their summer patterns with water temperatures stabilizing in the mid-70s.

  • West Virginia Gobbler

    Keith Lilly displays the gobbler he took during a trip to West Virginia. The bird sported a 9 1/2-inch beard and sharp 1 3/8-inch spurs.

  • Hunter Education teaches safe hunting

    By Kevin Kelly

    Ky. Dept. of Fish & Wildlife Resources

    It is a few minutes before 6 p.m. on Friday and vehicles continue pulling into the parking lot at the Scott County Extension Center.

    An orange sign marked “Hunter Education” confirms the visitors are in the right place and directs them to proceed to the North Room, where a uniformed Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources conservation educator welcomes his new students.

  • Striped bass coming back at Lake Cumberland

    By Lee McClellan

    Ky. Dept. of Fish & Wildlife Resources

    A jointed Thunderstick or Redfin lure slowly worked on the surface along a main lake bank on Lake Cumberland at 3 a.m. in late April may provoke a reaction from a striped bass that feels like it could rip your arm off your shoulder.

    The savagery of a surface strike from a striped bass on a late spring night on Lake Cumberland is one of the outdoor experiences that sears into the brain, leaving a lifelong scar that itches every April.

  • Leave young wildlife alone at this time of year

    By Lee McClellan

    Ky. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources

     

    It is a demonstration of the best traits of the human race, but can end in error.

    At this time of year, people see young wildlife seemingly abandoned by their parents. Deer fawns left alone in a grassy field. Baby birds that fall from their nests, seemingly helpless in your backyard.

  • Dedication for memorial to fallen conservation officers set for May 17

    Officials will dedicate a memorial to Kentucky’s fallen conservation officers during a ceremony set for 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 17, according to a news release.

    The memorial is located on the campus of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in Frankfort.

    The memorial, a project of the Kentucky Conservation Officers’ Association, honors the six Kentucky conservation officers killed in the line of duty since 1918, the release said.