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Today's News

  • Future Bearcats learn at football camp
  • 3 regional titles make a very good year

    Today, June 25, is that day many high school coaches have had circled on their calendars since, oh, about this time last year.

    Vacation time!

    OK, it's the start of the dead period, mandated by the Kentucky High School Athletic Association.

    From now until July 9, high school athletic programs in the state are shut down, for all practical purposes. Athletes are off limits to coaches. Facilities are off limits to the players, for the most part, and it is just a good time for everyone to take the break for which the rule was enacted.

  • Corrections and clarifications

    Destiny Stewart's name was inadvertently omitted from a listing of Anderson County athletes who had participated in a state tournament at least three times. Stewart participated in the 2010, 2013 and 2014 girls' state basketball tournaments and was a member of the starting five the last two years. The News regrets the error.

  • The Coach Bird way won't see drastic changes

    Almost as soon as Tony Kays stepped down as girls' basketball coach at Anderson County High School, the most-asked questions were two-fold.

    Who would be Kays' replacement?

    And what kind of style will the Lady Bearcats play?

    It turns out neither should be a surprise. While the Anderson opening was undoubtedly attractive, it would have been surprising to most observers if anyone other than Clay Birdwhistell had been selected for the job.

  • Birdwhistell lands job of his dreams

    It was somehow fitting that the call came when Clay Birdwhistell was at basketball camp.

    And he was alone.

    An assistant girls' basketball coach at Anderson County High School since 2006, Birdwhistell was officially offered the promotion to head coach last Tuesday while the Lady Bearcats were participating in a summer camp at Campbellsville University.

  • Mudcats capture own tournament

    It might have been worth the wait for the Central Kentucky Mudcats.

    The local travelling baseball team defeated the Dirty Dawgs, a team based in the London-Corbin area, 3-2, Sunday afternoon to win the annual Mudcat Classic at Anderson County High School's Barnes Field. It was the first time the Mudcats have taken their own tournament in its eight-year existence.

    Josh Brown gave up two first inning runs, then dominated the Dawgs the rest of the way to get the win.

  • Hard work took DeLong past good enough

    At the time, the words stung. More than a decade later, they might be the most important ones Kyle DeLong heard during his baseball career.

    “You're not good enough.”

    DeLong still remembers the words, even though his playing career ended over a year ago.

    “I really don't remember who told me that but I was wanting to pitch and he told me I wasn't good enough,” DeLong smiles. “When that happened was when I started working my tail off. I realized it was on me if I wanted to pitch.”

  • Three injured on South Bypass car crash

    Kentucky State Police Post 12 Public Affairs Officer Kendra Wilson confirmed this afternoon that three were injured in the 127 South Bypass car crash yesterday around 4 p.m.

    Wilson said speed was a factor in the crash involving two vehicles and a semi tractor trailer.

    No serious injuries were reported, Wilson said.
    For the full story, see the Wednesday July 2 edition of The Anderson News.

  • Adult Education Program celebrates 25 years of changing lives

    The Anderson County Adult Education Program celebrated 18 students who recently received their GED certification Monday of last week at the high school auditorium.

    Another special milestone was marked, the adult education program’s 25th anniversary.

    Jacqueline Zeller, community education director, chronicled the humble beginnings of the adult education program, which started from the diligence of Helen Shryock, a retired Anderson County High School home economics teacher.

  • Anderson County recycling gets a cut of $3 million grant

    Not everybody agrees that Anderson County’s recycling program makes sense but few would argue that improvements paid from grants do.

    Anderson County Fiscal Court recently secured nearly $40,000 from the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Waste Management. It will be used for a 42 cubic yard compaction container, three 22 cubic yard recycling trailers and advertising and education, according to Anderson County Solid Waste Committee Chair David Ruggles.