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Today's News

  • Saffell St. Elementary principal to retire April 1

    The Saffell Street Elementary site-based decision making council will begin its search for a new elementary principal due to Principal Robin Arnzen’s plans to retire by April 1, according to an email from Superintendent Sheila Mitchell.
    Mitchell said she received a letter informing her of Arnzen’s intention to retire last Friday, and the district posted an opening for a new Saffell Street principal on Friday, Jan. 17.

  • WWII vet remembered as ‘American hero’

    Truman Wells, an Anderson County World War II veteran who received his high school diploma at age 85 and was recognized by former Congressman Ben Chandler for his service, died Jan. 16 at the Veterans Affairs Center in Lexington.
    Wells was a native of Anderson County, and was born the son of the late Lillis Ray Drury and Roy Thomas Wells.
    Wells worked for many years as a respected contractor in Lawrenceburg, and served in the infantry division of the U.S. Army during World War II. He saw action in Normandy and was the recipient of the Purple Heart.

  • Workers, boss discuss minimum wage hike

    Last Friday morning at Edwardo’s Pizza and Subs began with the usual chores of mixing the dough, slicing up fresh vegetables for the lunchtime salad bar, as well as a conversation about the potential effects of a minimum wage hike in Kentucky.
    Owner Dave Richmond, who opened Edwardo’s four years ago, sat in the quiet Lawrenceburg restaurant, empty except for the employees busy preparing for the anticipated lunch rush a few hours later.

  • Insurer opts out of Obamacare enrollments

    When Obamacare launched last October, Rodney Goodlett, owner of the Goodlett Insurance Group in Anderson County, was all set to help the uninsured sign up.
    Goodlett, who says he could “see both sides” of the controversial new healthcare law, spent hours training and testing to become certified to sign people up in the state’s insurance exchange but soon realized that effort simply wouldn’t pay off.

  • Sign ordinance would allow 32 billboards

    A vote on a proposed sign ordinance that would greatly add to the number of billboards allowed in the county and strip malls to erect multi-user signs was delayed last Thursday at the request of the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce.
    Saying they had not had a chance to discuss changes proposed by the joint city/county planning and zoning commission, chamber officials asked that the vote be tabled until the commission meets in February.

  • BASKETBALL: Bearcats sizzle nets, fizzle down stretch

    Even a night when Anderson County was burning the nets was not enough in a district matchup at Collins last Tuesday.

    The Bearcats shot better than 73 percent (19-for-26) and missed just one two-point field goal attempt all night but still came up short in a 63-55 decision that dropped the Bearcats to 0-2 in 30th District play.

  • BASKETBALL: Lady Bearcats hungry to repeat

    It's been over four years since that November afternoon when the girls' basketball team from Anderson County Middle School was crowned the best in Kentucky.

    At Rupp Arena that Friday after Thanksgiving, the Lady Mustangs whipped Whitley County, got a big trophy and went back to work.

  • Barnes inducted into Hall of Fame

    Anderson County High School baseball coach L. W. Barnes was inducted into the Kentucky High School Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame last week.

  • BASKETBALL: Lady Bearcats to tangle with top West Va. team

    It's all about getting better.

    Coach Tony Kays sprinkled the Lady Bearcats' schedule with rugged teams from out of the region, and even out of the state, with the intention being to pay dividends in the regional and state tournaments.

    Such is the case Friday and Saturday when the Lady Bearcats have two monumental tests in the Raatz Fence Classic at Mercy Academy in Louisville.

  • COLUMN: No pedestal for Farmer, other athletes

    Last week's chapter of the Richie Farmer saga was more than the wheels of justice turning.

    It was a dagger through the heart of a story -- a hometown, feel good story that evolved into a sordid nightmare. And while no one can excuse the basketball legend's actions as Kentucky's Commissioner of Agriculture, the whole affair should serve to make us pause and look at ourselves and how we view those who are gifted at playing a game.