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Today's News

  • Even without McKee and Cann, Lady Bearcats could return to Diddle

    The reality will probably hit Tony Kays sometime around October 15.

    That's when high school basketball teams can drop the “informal” and “conditioning” tags from their gatherings and get to work on the 2014-15 season.

  • Anderson County schools will lose four certified positions

    Budget issues and cutting four certified positions for the 2014-2015 school year were discussed at the Anderson County School Board meeting Monday of last week.

    Sheila Mitchell, Anderson County Schools superintendent, noted that the school district has cut about $2.7 million from the budget over the past 3 years by staff reductions, energy savings and a 5 percent reduction in all departments.

    Mitchell outlined several factors that have negatively impacted the budget, leading to staff reductions.

    SEEK has decreased

  • Abandoned roads aren’t ‘fiscally doable’

    Anderson County Fiscal Court once again unanimously voted down taking on maintenance of abandoned county roads in a special-called budget meeting Friday.

    John Wayne Conway, Anderson County judge-executive, said abandoned county roads have been a topic of conversation since January 2011 and the board previously voted down taking on the additional road maintenance. Since Conway received several phone calls from Anderson County residents about the issue, he said he decided to re-address the matter with fiscal court.

  • Spray park, utility costs and tourism top City budget discussion

    Increased utility costs, a potential spray park project and the need for tourism promotion gave an otherwise perfunctory budget discussion a shot in the arm during the Lawrenceburg City Council Finance Committee meeting Monday of last week.

  • Woodworker Rick Davidson gives old barns a second life

    Gratitude for Growers is a series about growers, farmers and craftsmen of the Anderson County Farmers Market. The stories will celebrate farmers market vendors and allow readers to have a greater appreciation of the local faces who produce.

    As a woodworker, Rick Davidson breathes new life into old, dilapidated wood barns, re-purposing the wood to create clocks, birdhouses, bird feeders and picture frames.

    “I like to use old 1800s barn wood,” said Davidson. “It looks nice and the wood lasts for a long time.”

  • Budget amendments adds $70,000 to road fund for this fiscal year

    Lawrenceburg City Council held a public hearing for community input regarding a Land & Water Conservation Grant the City is submitting for $75,000 to help construct a spray park at Legion Park.

    Mayor Edwinna Baker kept the hearing open for nearly an hour, including throughout a special-called City Council meeting, but there were no public comments by the time it was adjourned.

  • School board wants more than a Band-Aide for nurse shortage

    The need for an additional school nurse was discussed at the Anderson County Board of Education meeting Monday of last week.

    Anderson County Schools had five school nurses, supplied by the Anderson County Health Department, but a nurse resigned late last year and the position was never filled.

    The school board weighed its options to hire a fifth nurse, hire a part-time nurse or maximize efficiency with the current four nurses.

  • Wooldridge is new Saffell Street principal

    Saffell Street Elementary Site-Based Decision Making Council unanimously named Todd Wooldridge new principal Wednesday of last week.

    According to Sheila Mitchell, Anderson County Schools superintendent, 13 of 31 applicants for the position were interviewed.

    Wooldridge comes from Franklin County where he currently serves as interim principal at Elkhorn Elementary School. Prior to that, he worked at Hearn Elementary as an intermediate classroom teacher.

  • Prom... enade
  • Take pride in this initiative to showcase Anderson County

    What a treat it is to witness inspiration fuel action. I’ve always believed that, particularly in small communities, the best initiatives are those born from grass roots efforts.

    One such initiative is springing to life in Anderson County. On the outside, it might appear to be little more than a fun project connected to a fun event.

    Much deeper, it’s the beginning of a movement to lift Anderson County out of the shadows and show the rest of the world what a great place it is for visiting, working and living.

    Here’s the lowdown.